battery

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battery

 [bat´er-e]
1. a set or series of cells that yield an electric current.
2. any set, series, or grouping of similar things, as a battery of tests.

bat·ter·y

(bat'er-ē),
A group or series of tests administered for analytic or diagnostic purposes.
[M.E. batri, beaten metal, fr. O.Fr. batre, to beat]

battery

Cardiac pacing
One or more power cells, usually chemical, that serve as a source of electrical power.
 
Chemistry
A group of voltaic cells connected in series.
 
Lab medicine
A panel of tests.

Medical malpractice
The unauthorised touching of another person.

battery

Cardiac pacing One or more power cells, usually chemical, that serve as a source of electrical power Lab medicine A panel of tests. See Panel, Test battery Medical malpractice The unauthorized touching of another person. See Assault, Ghost surgery, Informed consent, Malpractice.

bat·ter·y

(bat'ĕr-ē)
1. A group or series of tests administered for analytic or diagnostic purposes.
2. Device that turns chemical energy into electrical.
3. Unlawful touching of another person.
4. Any form of physical violence against another person.
[M.E. batri, beaten metal, fr. O.Fr. batre, to beat]

bat·ter·y

(bat'ĕr-ē)
Series of tests administered for analytic or diagnostic purposes.
[M.E. batri, beaten metal, fr. O.Fr. batre, to beat]
References in periodicals archive ?
2001), the Florida Supreme Court quashed the First DCA's decision and ruled that an aggravated battery could serve as a prior conviction for felony battery.
The court's reasoning was simply that "battery" refers to the touching or striking of another person and "aggravated battery" refers to the touching or striking of another which causes great bodily injury or where a deadly weapon is used.
While the First DCA decided the legislature intended harsher punishment for misdemeanor recidivists since they had not yet been subjected to felony punishment, the Florida Supreme Court reasoned that excluding an aggravated battery conviction as a predicate would allow a reoffending batterer to receive the same misdemeanor punishment, after having committed both a simple battery and a battery where he seriously injured someone or used a deadly weapon, as would a person who had only committed a simple battery.
Frankie Rivera Jr., 24, of Carpentersville, faces charges of home invasion, armed robbery and aggravated battery with a firearm.
Court records show she also was arrested and charged with aggravated battery to a peace officer and other felonies after a case in late November 2018.
If convicted of the most severe charge of aggravated battery to a police officer, Shelly faces a sentence ranging from probation to up to seven years in prison in each case.
Keffery Cothern of Pana was charged with two counts, aggravated battery and domestic battery/harm, in Christian County court.
Morrissey, 20, of Pana, is charged with one count of aggravated battery to commit bodily harm and first degree murder in connection with the death of Stephen Lee Presnell, 59, who resided at Lake Pana.
While in Christian County Jail awaiting trial, Morrisey has been charged with aggravated battery of a police officer in February of this year, which will also be heard on Sept.
Austin Casner, 32, of Pana admitted June 28 to having violated the terms of his probation relating to an aggravated battery conviction, a 2018 case.