agglomeration

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ag·gre·ga·tion

(ag-rĕ-gā'shŭn),
A crowded mass of independent but similar units; a cluster.
Synonym(s): agglomeration

agglomeration

Etymology: L, agglomerare, to gather into a ball
a mass or cluster of individual units. agglomerate, v.

agglomeration

(1) Aggregation.
(2) Agglutination.
References in periodicals archive ?
The arguments outlined here imply that if globalisation is associated with falling spatial transactions costs and agglomeration economies, then globalisation will lead to increasing differences between the fortunes of regions and cities within the same parts of the global economy and even within the same country.
However, as population increases further, agglomeration economies set in that further outweigh the increase in the cost of land and we see costs falling significantly till we reach a population of 0.
Like for profit studies, I find evidence of within-industry agglomeration economies and, to a lesser extent, a negative relation between outside-industry concentration and location.
Many individuals involved in entrepreneurial ventures to create and market their innovations deemed traditional agglomeration economies extremely valuable.
The Location of FIRE Firms in Canada and Possible Agglomeration Economies Explanations
Hanson (1998) disentangles the effects of two opposing forces on regional labor demand: transport-cost considerations, which encourage firms to relocate their activities to regions with relatively good access to foreign markets, and agglomeration economies, which reinforces the pre-trade pattern of industry location.
If foreign firms choose their location based on location advantages and agglomeration economies, such choices must affect performance.
4) Cantwell (1991) states that agglomeration economies are likely to be strong in high technology industries.
In particular, FDI flows at the provincial level are expected to be affected by China's FDI regime, local market size, labor costs, labor quality, agglomeration economies, transportation costs, FDI incentives, and cultural links with investors.
Empirical work in general supports the hypothesis that agglomeration economies are decisive location factors (Head, Ries, and Swenson, 1995; Guimaraes, Figueiredo, and Woodward, 2000).
Although the benefits of agglomeration economies are attractive, maturing industrial centers inevitably experience costs increases (e.