amprenavir

(redirected from Agenerase)
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Related to Agenerase: Invirase, Aptivus

amprenavir

 [am-pren´ah-vir]
an HIV protease inhibitor used in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; administered orally.

amprenavir

A protease inhibitor used with other antiretrovirals for managing HIV-1 (e.g., nelfinavir, indinavir or saquinavir).

Adverse effects
Nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, headache, perioral paraesthesias, gastric discomfort, rash, hyperglycaemia, diabetes, acute haemolytic anaemia, spontaneous bleeding in haemophiliacs, fat redistribution.

amprenavir

AIDS A protease inhibitor in clinical trials for treating HIV, used in combination with other protease inhibitors–eg, nelfinavir, indinavir, or saquinavir Adverse effects N&V, diarrhea, headache, perioral paresthesias, stomach discomfort, rash; other effects include hyperglycemia, DM, acute hemolytic anemia, spontaneous bleeding in hemophiliacs, and fat redistribution. See AIDS, Combination therapy, HIV, Protease inhibitor.

amprenavir

A protease inhibitor drug used to treat HIV infections. A brand name is Agenerase.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pharmaceutical group Glaxo Wellcome saw its shares move ahead 40p to pounds 19.80 as it received approval from the European Commission to market its Agenerase protease inhibitor, used for HIV patients, in all 15 countries in the EU.
Vertex's first approved product is Agenerase (amprenavir), an HIV protease inhibitor, which Vertex co-promotes with Glaxo Wellcome.
* Scores for these new drugs are preliminary, and these drugs do not appear in the original table.(2) [dagger] Lexiva (fosamprenavir) should penetrate CSF similarly to Agenerase (amprenavir).
Luber, executive director of research at Tower ID Medical Associates, Los Angeles, noted that amprenavir (Agenerase) is the only protease inhibitor currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for once-daily dosing.
Currently available anti-HIV drugs Protease Inhibitors Nucleotide Reverse Agenerase (generic name: amprenavir) Transcriptase Inhibitor Crixivan (indinavir) Viread (tenofovir, PMPA) Fortovase (saquinavir) Kaletra (lopinavir plus ritonavir) Nucleoside Reverse Norvir (ritonavir) Transcriptase Inhibitors Viracept (nelfinavir) Combivir (AZT plus 3TC) Epivir (lamivudine, also Nonnucleoside Reverse known as 3TC) Transcriptase Inhibitors Hivid (zalcitabine, ddC) Rescriptor (delavirdine) Retrovir (zidovudine, AZT) Sustiva (efavirenz) Trizivir (abacavir plus AZT plus 3TC) Viramune (nevirapine) Videx (didanosine, ddl) Zerit (stavudine, d4T) Ziagen (abacavir)
-- The Food and Drug Administration has approved Agenerase for the treatment of HIV infection.
Agenerase (amprenavir; formerly 141W94, VX - 478) is a new protease inhibitor drug from Vertex and Glaxo Wellcome in Phase III clinical trials.
Hoffman-LaRoche developed an "improved" version of saquinavir (Fortovase) and GlaxoSmithKline developed fosamprenavir (Lexiva) to replace amprenavir (Agenerase).
After 24 weeks, the combination of Invirase, Agenerase, and Norvir plus nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs or "nukes") decreased viral load and increased T cell count.
* For certain advanced patients, a combination of amprenavir (Agenerase) and lopinavir plus ritonavir (Kaletra), with some extra ritonavir (Norvir) added to overcome an interaction that would reduce the levels the other two drugs, appeared to work well.
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] TABLE: Currently approved medications for treating HIV/AIDS Protease Entry Nukes Non-nukes Inhibitors Inhibitors Combivir Rescriptor Agenerase Fuzeon (Epivir + Retrovir) Emtriva Sustiva Crixivan Epivir Viramune Fortovase Hivid Invirase Retrovir Kaletra Trizivir (Epivir + Lexiva Retrovir + Ziagen) Videx (regular or EC) Norvir Viread Reyataz Zerit Viracept Ziagen
On February 5, 2002, FDA approved a new dosing regimen for Agenerase (amprenavir) and Norvir (ritonavir) used in combination.