life table

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Related to Age-specific death rate: Crude Mortality Rate

table

 [ta´b'l]
a flat layer or surface.
cohort life table a life table giving the survival data of a cohort of individuals in a clinical study or trial, i.e., the number alive and under observation (not lost to follow-up) at the beginning of each year, the number dying in each year, the number lost to follow-up each year, the conditional probability of survival for each year, and the cumulative probabilities of survival from the beginning of the study to the end of each year.
inner table the inner compact layer of the bones covering the brain.
life table any of various tables describing mortality and survival data for groups of individuals at specific times or over defined intervals; tables may summarize combined mortality experience by age over a brief period or may follow a cohort over time (cohort life table).
outer table the outer compact layer of the bones covering the brain.
tilt table a plinth, equipped with a footboard for support, to which a patient can be strapped for rotation to a nearly upright position; used in cases of spinal cord injury and other neurological disorders to enhance blood circulation to the lower limbs, improve posture, and aid in muscle training and sense of balance.
vitreous table inner table.

life ta·ble

a representation of the probable years of survivorship of a defined population of subjects; given that survivorship is changed by new methods of prevention or treatment, a diachronic study is commonly used, the main interest of which lies in the composite structure of the current population. (In the summarizing technique used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in a population, survivors to age x are denoted by the symbol lx and the expectation of life at age x is denoted by the symbol x.)

life table

Public health A table that presents the results of a clinical study in which subjects enter and leave the trial at different times; each subject has a well-defined point of entry–onset of treatment and end point–relapse, death or other; all subjects may be evaluated at determined intervals with respect to the expected survival of an idealized person, based on actuarial analysis of census data and mortality rates

life ta·ble

(līf tā'bĕl)
A representation of the probable years of survivorship of a defined population of subjects.

life table

a table giving details of the mortality of a species or organism and all stages of the life history.

life table

a tabulation of deaths occurring in age groups, often with other information; may be a current life table, when all of the animals in a population at one time are surveyed, or a cohort table, when all of the animals born in a particular time span are dealt with as a group.
References in periodicals archive ?
16 Rate per 100,000 population Figure 1 Annual average age-specific death rates of accidental alcohol poisoning (ICD-9 code: E860), United States, 1996-1998.
As death rates at older ages decline, the rate of increase in total life expectancy at these ages converges to the rate of increase in life expectancy at birth, implying that the intersection problems inherent in direct extrapolation of age-specific total life expectancies can be avoided by extrapolating age-specific death rates.
The Lee-Carter model (Lee and Carter, 1992) for forecasting mortality rates has been used to demonstrate that changes in the logarithms of US national age-specific death rates during 1900-1989, and beyond, can be accurately represented as a random walk with drift, an especially simple type of time series structure.
Compared with whites, age-specific death rates for blacks were 2.
During 1998, age-specific death rates per 100,000 persons increased among successive age groups for CHD and AMI.
Age-specific death rates in Suffolk County and New York increased with age (Figure 1).
During both years, age-specific death rates for intoxicated pedestrians were lowest for persons aged [greater than]65 years.
Age-specific death rates were highest for persons aged 35-44 years.
Age-specific death rates increased with age for men in the 35-44-year through 65-74-year age groups (from 15.
Potential indicators include age-specific death rates for persons aged [greater than or equal to] 65 years; incidence rates for measles, diphtheria, and pertussis; incidence rates for bacterial dysentery; incidence rates for anemia in pregnant women; diabetes-specific hospital-admission and death rates; death rates for selected surgical conditions; perinatal mortality rates in maternity hospitals; asthma death rates; and emergency room-based death rates for selected injuries.