AREDS

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AREDS

Age-Related Eye Disease Study. A trial sponsored by the US National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health, which compared the effects of zinc and/or antioxidants to a placebo.
Conclusion Patients taking antioxidants and zinc had a significant reduction in the risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration.
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(13.) Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 Research Group, Huynh N, Nicholson BP, Agron E, Clemons TE, Bressler SB, Rosenfeld PJ, Chew EY.
Renzi-Hammond, "Perspective: a critical look at the ancillary age-related eye disease study 2: nutrition and cognitive function results in older individuals with age-related macular degeneration," Advances in Nutrition, vol.
Congdon et al., "Potential public health impact of Age-Related Eye Disease Study results: AREDS report no.
"Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS)." National Eye Institute.
According to the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), a combination of 500 milligrams (mg) of vitamin C, 400 International Units (IU) of vitamin E, 15 mg of beta-carotene (often labeled as equivalent to 25,000 IU of vitamin A), 80 mg of zinc (as zinc oxide), and 2 mg of copper (as cupric oxide) appear to significantly reduce the progression of dry AMD.
High levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream may help protect against early age-related macular degeneration in women younger than 75 years, according to the latest findings from the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study, a study to investigate the relationship of carotenoids in the diet, serum, and retina to AMD and cataracts.
The National Eye Institute (NEI), in collaboration with the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), has made available more than 72,000 lens photographs and fundus photographs of the back of the eye, collected from the participants of the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS).
For one study, the researchers analyzed dietary intake and other data from 4,003 men and women, age 55 to 80, who had participated in a long term Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS).
For one study, the researchers analyzed dietary intake and other data from 4,003 men and women, aged 55 to 80, who had participated in the long-term, NEI-funded Age-Related Eye Disease Study, or AREDS.
B&L sponsored a 10-year clinical study in cooperation with the National Institutes of Health to validate the effectiveness of its PreserVision Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formula in slowing down the effects of AMD.
Data from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study show that taking the following supplements reduced the risk of vision loss in some people with intermediate or advanced AMD:
The ophthalmologist gave the patient information about nutrition and the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), and suggested vitamins for his "eyeballs." The patient knows you the best and solicits your opinion on whether there is evidence that vitamins work.