AREDS

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AREDS

Age-Related Eye Disease Study. A trial sponsored by the US National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health, which compared the effects of zinc and/or antioxidants to a placebo.
Conclusion Patients taking antioxidants and zinc had a significant reduction in the risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration.
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The Age-Related Eye Disease Study system for classifying age-related macular degeneration from stereoscopic color fundus photographs: the Age-Related Eye Disease Study Report Number 6.
and colleagues with the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) Research Group examined whether adding lutein + zeaxanthin, DHA + EPA, or both to the AREDS formulation might further reduce the risk of progression to advanced AMD.
of the State University of New York at Buffalo and her colleagues wanted to confirm the protective effect of vitamin D among subjects in the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS).
Data from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study show that taking the following supplements reduced the risk of vision loss in some people with intermediate or advanced AMD:
The ophthalmologist gave the patient information about nutrition and the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), and suggested vitamins for his "eyeballs.
In the latest study, scientists involved in the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (Careds) recruited a number of older women who had either high or low dietary intakes of lutein and zeaxanthin.
The Age-Related Eye Disease Study found that patients with extensive drusen but no advanced macular degeneration in either eye had an 11% chance of going from legal driving vision to legal blindness within 5 years.
To illustrate the complexity of researching dietary effects on vision, Kurinij compares randomized clinical trial results from the NEI's Age-Related Eye Disease Study to cataract studies conducted in Linxian, China.
27) reported that dietary carotenoids decrease the risk of cataracts severe enough to require extraction, whereas the Age-Related Eye Disease Study showed no effect of antioxidant formulation on the 7-year risk of development or progression of age-related lens opacities (28).
Since he didn't offer any preventative measures, I read everything that I could get my hands on, which is how I learned of Harvard's Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) and other studies on the relationship between eating large amounts of greens and reducing the risk of MD.
Reporting on the public health implications of the national Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), published two years ago and supported by the National Eye Institute, a team of Johns Hopkins ophthalmologists and other scientists participating in AREDS estimate there are eight million people in the United States age 55 or older at high risk for advanced forms of the disorder that destroys central vision and who could benefit from daily vitamin treatment.
Dietary zinc supplementation is now commonly prescribed for AMD on the basis of the benefits recently reported from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (3).