Age Adjusted Death Rate

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Age Adjusted Death Rate

A death rate that controls for the effects of differences in population age distributions, a value which indicates the risk of dying relative to a standard population. The AADR is thought to be more efficient than crude death rates for comparing mortality of population groups with different age structures.
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Nine-year average crude mortality rates were used to calculate the age-adjusted mortality rates for each block group.
All states reported coccidioidomycosis-associated deaths; however, most deaths occurred in California (1,451 [47.0%]) and Arizona (1,010 [32.7%]); age-adjusted mortality rates were 2.47 (95% CI 2.35-2.60) and 10.60 (95% CI 9.94-11.25) deaths per 1 million person-years, respectively (Figure 2).
Cochise and Pima Counties made more than 75% progress toward the goal from 2000 to 2007, although these age-adjusted mortality rates were still higher than in the Arizona population.
The overall decrease in age-adjusted mortality rates can be attributed to declines among children aged <15 years because no linear decline was observed when children were excluded from models.
The age-adjusted mortality rates were mapped by county by using geographic information system software.
Figure 4 and Table 4 show gender differences (men minus women) of age-adjusted mortality rates and predictions utilizing quinquennial historical data.
Age-adjusted mortality rates of BNHs age 45-54 fell by 2.7 percent a year from 1999 to 2015, and those of Hispanics fell by 1.9 percent.
All-cause injury age-adjusted mortality rates per 100 000 (Figure 1A) in the US rose monotonically from 52.8 in 2000 to 59.6 in 2007, dropped for two years, and then rose again monotonically so that by 2014, rates (59.9) exceeded the 2007 level.
Between 1989 and 2007, age-adjusted mortality rates related to injuries declined significantly in 5-year age groups of 0-19 years, and those for boys aged 0-19 years were 2.1 times higher than girls [Table 1], [Figure 1], and Supplemental Figure S1].
The emotional language of the tweets was measured and then compared with county-level, age-adjusted mortality rates for AHD.
We computed age-adjusted mortality rates using adjustment weights from the year 2000 US standard population data.
Average age-adjusted mortality rates (Table 4) were significantly higher among men than women for all time periods (P < 0.001).

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