Age Adjusted Death Rate

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Age Adjusted Death Rate

A death rate that controls for the effects of differences in population age distributions, a value which indicates the risk of dying relative to a standard population. The AADR is thought to be more efficient than crude death rates for comparing mortality of population groups with different age structures.
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The overall decrease in age-adjusted mortality rates can be attributed to declines among children aged <15 years because no linear decline was observed when children were excluded from models.
This is particularly true for the state of Texas, where in 2003 the age-adjusted mortality rate for colorectal cancer was estimated at 26.
Nine-year average crude mortality rates were used to calculate the age-adjusted mortality rates for each block group.
While most of these causes are the same as in the rest of the United States, the age-adjusted mortality rates are higher for certain conditions, including diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer's disease, chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, and suicide (3).
1 program was used to determine the age-adjusted mortality rates by federative entity and socioeconomic region.
The age-adjusted mortality rates were mapped by county by using geographic information system software.
Over the 13-year study period, 221 cysticercosis deaths were identified, representing an annual age-adjusted mortality rate of 0.
These deaths accounted for 52% of all deaths and for an overall age-adjusted mortality rate of 457.
Figure A1 shows that mortality is normally distributed across counties, and Figure A2 shows a general downward trend in age-adjusted mortality rates over time.
Figure 3 and Table 3 show quinquennial age-adjusted mortality rates for the historical fitted data, stratified by gender and by condition, from 1994 to 2012, and 50% prediction intervals for the 2013-2017 and for the 2018-2022 periods.
All-cause injury age-adjusted mortality rates per 100 000 (Figure 1A) in the US rose monotonically from 52.
Age-adjusted mortality rates are calculated using the direct method with reference to US 2000 standard population for international comparison.

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