agave

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AGAVE

Architecture for Genomic Annotation, Visualization & Exchange. An XML format developed by DoubleTwist for managing, visualising and sharing annotations of genomic sequences, which provides a free open standard for the life sciences community.

agave

a semi-woody perennial native of the American continent. Pulque and aquamiel are produced from it as fermented beverages, and mescal and tequila may in turn be distilled from these.
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Corazon Tequila comes from Casa San Matias Distillery in the Highlands of Jalisco, where the mature agaves are steamed in stone ovens.
"Now we are having trouble keeping up with category growth and the endless varietals of wild agave in the marketplace.
The people of the Mexican state of Oaxaca earn their living making pulque, a traditional drink made with Agave. But the beverage, considered sacred, is under threat.
VEGETAL SYNERGISTS FOR TRAPPING THE ADULT OF SCYPHOPHORUS ACUPUNCTATUS GYLLENHAL, IN PHEROMONE BAITED TRAPS, IN AGAVE ANGUSTIFOLIA HAW., IN MORELOS, MEXICO
Las caracteristicas edaficas, clima y altura son aptas para el cultivo del agave y produccion de mezcal (Bautista y Teran, 2008).
These studies also reported that the response of agave weevil to the pheromone is synergized by the presence of the host plant volatiles.
Therefore, we speculated that the fiber-related traits in agaves are more likely controlled by hormonal and transcriptional regulation.
En En lo ancestral hay futuro: del tequila, los mezcales y otros agaves, editado por P.
"Trends also indicate that consumers are trading up into the premium and super-premium spaces, as they become more educated on the category and 100% agave tequilas."
Entre las aplicaciones mas importantes de los agaves por los grupos humanos esta su uso como fuente de fibras duras, medicinas, alimentacion, elaboracion de papel, elaboracion de bebidas alcoholicas fermentadas y destiladas (Gentry 1982, Dahlgren et al.
Indeed, succulents, including agave (Agave), have been reported in the diet of desert ungulates as a source of water during drought.