agar

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agar

 [ag´ahr]
a dried hydrophilic, colloidal substance extracted from various species of red algae. It is used in cultures for bacteria and other microorganisms, in making emulsions, and as a supporting medium in procedures such as immunodiffusion and electrophoresis. Because of its bulk it is also used in medicines to promote peristalsis and relieve constipation.

a·gar

(ah'gar, ā'gar),
A complex polysaccharide (a sulfated galactan) derived from seaweed (various red algae); used as a solidifying agent in culture media; it has the valuable properties of melting at 100°C, but not of solidifying until 49°C. Synthetic agars are also available.
[Bengalese]

agar

(ā′gär′, ä′gär′) also

agar-agar

(ā′gär-ā′gär′, ä′gär-ä′-)
n.
1. A gelatinous material derived from certain marine algae. It is used as a base for bacterial culture media and as a stabilizer and thickener in many food products.
2. A culture medium containing this material.

Agar

(1) Agar
A gelatinous, sulfated polysaccharide extracted primarily from Gelidium cartilagineum, Gracilaria confervoides, and related species of red algae (seaweed); it melts at ±100ºC and solidifies at ±40ºC.
Herbal medicine Agar has been used as a bulk laxative, as it is highly hydrophilic. 
Microbiology Agar is the most commonly used support medium for bacterial and fungal culture, as nutrients, antibiotics, salts and various growth enhancers and inhibitors are easily incorporated into the media.
Agar is also used as an emulsifier in foods; it cannot be digested by humans.
(2) AGAR
Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance Study. An ongoing surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in Australian teaching hospitals,which began in 1986.

a·gar

(ā'gahr)
A complex polysaccharide (a sulfated galactan) derived from seaweed (various red algae); used as a solidifying agent in culture media. It has the valuable property of melting at 100°C but not solidifying above 49°C.
[Bengalese]

agar

A seaweed extract, sometimes called agar-agar, much used in bacteriological laboratories because it forms a convenient gel for the suspension of nutrient culture material, such as blood or broth, on which micro-organisms can be grown in an incubator.

agar

a complex POLYSACCHARIDE obtained from marine algae, which is widely used (in gel form) as a solidifying agent. Agar has two main components, agarose and agaropectin. Agar is used in various kinds of microbiological MEDIUM, and refined forms of agar or agarose are used in techniques such as ELECTROPHORESIS and gel filtration. In industry it is used as a gelling agent in foods such as jellies, soups and ice cream.

Agar has certain properties that make it particularly valuable in MICROBIOLOGY:

  1. it is translucent or transparent and is degraded by only a few MICROORGANISMS.
  2. it melts at about the boiling point of water, but remains liquid until the temperature has dropped to about 40–45 °C, when gelling occurs. Thus it can be poured over or mixed with a bacterial INOCULUM at about 50 °C, without injuring the bacteria. Once it has solidified it can be incubated at temperatures up to about 65 °C, perhaps higher, without liquifying. This is particularly useful where THERMOPHILIC microorganisms are being grown.

Agar medium is prepared by adding agar, often before autoclaving (see AUTOCLAVE), to the nutrients etc. of the medium. Agar medium is generally contained in a PETRI DISH (plate) or test tube. The test tubes containing agar are called ‘slants’ or ‘slopes’ when they allow the medium to set at an angle. When the agar solidifies in a vertical tube it is called a ‘deep’. In a Petri dish the medium solidifies as a layer over the base of the dish.

Agar

A gel made from red algae that is used to culture certain disease agents in the laboratory.
Mentioned in: Throat Culture

a·gar

(ā'gahr)
A complex polysaccharide (a sulfated galactan) derived from seaweed (various red algae); used as a solidifying agent in culture media.
[Bengalese]
References in periodicals archive ?
The market profile is all about the manufacturing technology and applications that describe the growth of the Agar Agar Gummarket.
The Gelidium Sesquipedal red seaweed, known all over the world for the quality of the agar agar it contains, is very abundant on the Moroccan Atlantic coast.
* Place the agar agar along with the water on low heat and keep stirring till the agar agar is completely dissolved.
3 cups peeled, sliced ripe peaches 10 ounces firm silken tofu, drained 1/4 cup maple syrup 1 Tablespoon lemon juice Generous pinch of nutmeg or cardamom 1/8 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons agar or agar agar 1 cup peach or apricot nectar
I've tried making jellies with all sorts of vege-friendly setting agents, from gellan gum to carrageenan and agar agar, and, whilst on many occasions they manage to set the juice well enough, the texture of the resulting jelly is terrible.
One underrated food is: Agar agar, a substitute for gelatine in powder form.
Weigh puree and add 0.7 percent of weight in agar agar. Heat to 194 degrees.
lemon Applewood chips, for smoking For The pickle tots: * 3 pounds 12 ounces shredded russet or Kennebec potatoes 4 ounces unsalted butler 1 3/4 ounces gelatin sheets 1 pound, 6 ounces shredded dill pickles, squeezed dry 1 3/4ounces Activa 1/2 ounce agar agar Cornstarch, for dusting Salt For the red onion yogurt: * 1 large red onion, cut into medium pieces 1 pound, 9 ounces Greek yogurt l 1/4 ounces red beet juice Cayenne pepper Salt To serve: Canola oil, for frying For The garnish: Sliced green onion tops Dill sprigs * yields more than needed for plating For the dry cure: Mix salts and sugar together until well blended.
Contract awarded for Amies transport medium agar agar gel with plastic without carbon hiposo.
Carnero agar base (sheep blood base); use: diagnostic laboratory; reactive si; area: microbiology;,agar agar macconkey; use: diagnostic laboratory reagent: or area microbiologia;,manitol salt agar, agar; diagnostic laboratory use; reactive: yes, area: microbiologia,agar micosel; use: diagnostic laboratory; reactive: yes area microbiologia;,mueller hinton agar agar; diagnostic laboratory; reactive: yes area microbiologia; etc.
For the langoustine ribbon: Combine consomme with agar agar and
Uric acid (team for loan,blood agar agar base,cled agar,mc conkey agar,amylase (team for loan) etc.