Afrocentrism

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Related to Afrocentrists: Afrocentric Egyptology

Afrocentrism

A primarily American cultural philosophy which re-examines African American history and views the African American legacy as having been downplayed.
References in periodicals archive ?
This entropic polyvalence accommodates contradiction, overdetermination, irony: It accommodates the Blackness of Ramses II (pointed to by Afrocentrists as Black, though he lived long before Blackness had been invented) and the Blackness of Beethoven (whom Hitler lauded as a paragon of Aryan excellence, little imagining Beethoven's Black ancestry); it puts these contradictory forms of Blackness into proximity and ironic relation, and reveals new connections between the discourses of Afrocentrism and enlightenment.
No, this does not work, and what Afrocentrists have done is to propose that multiculturalism can only work when Whites are seen as being alongside every other cultural group, not above, not outside the mix as some governing hand.
Drawing on the statements of the most extreme multiculturalists and Afrocentrists of the 1980s and early 1990s, Schlesinger warned that, left unabated, the belittling of unum at the hands of a pugnacious pluribus would tear our schools asunder--and with them our communities and national identity.
My guess is that the present-day Obama has moved beyond the young man searching for ways to be authentically black and is now more in synch with the Ivy League intellectuals who have flocked to his banner than with Afrocentrists of the South Side.
The rich boil of rhyme spinners, sweet-tongued slick talkers, streetwise corner boys, high-minded race men and women, my-block griots, kente-clothed Afrocentrists, and chest-thumping Alis gave way to a bland array of hosts and hostesses for the Bling Shopping Network.
Like other Afrocentrists, Clenora Hudson-Weems develops a theory that is based on a static, transhistorical view of African culture and identity.
I think environment is far more important"; in an interview with Jonathan Little in 1993, he claims as his inheritance the thought of all American figures, regardless of race or class; in the Michael Boccia interview of 1996, he praises the defense of freedom of expression in America, and wonders if such freedom would be maintained if the cultural nationalists and afrocentrists had their way; in the Will Nash interview of 1998, he claims that as a Buddhist he is convinced that race is "an illusion." The entire book is filled with positions and claims charged with relevance to the American scene today.
"Carpetbagging Afrocentrists," as she terms them, are at least as much to blame for the predicament of black America as approval- seeking blacks.
By urging black Americans to seek empowerment in a misconstructed Egyptian history, Afrocentrists not only mislead, opening their students to ridicule, but they also assert that culture is "transhistoric"--that is, it can be transferred through time and space intact.
This debate has therefore been influenced by a range of discourses dealing with Africa, including those shaped by dependency and modernization theories to the cultural nationalism propounded by Afrocentrists (though not necessarily always of the "wild" variety which has been sharply attacked by authors like Stephe n Howe 1998).
(194) Obviously, this line of questioning would grant unthoughtfiul Afrocentrists and black cultural nationalists all they would need to expunge Baines from any canon of black literature they would care to devise.
Rogers, a writer who modern-day Afrocentrists call their own.