Afrocentrism

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Afrocentrism

A primarily American cultural philosophy which re-examines African American history and views the African American legacy as having been downplayed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The book is a pioneering conceptual articulation of Africology that also includes content that is reflective of the theory that became Afrocentricity two decades after its publication.
To what extent are ideas such as Afrocentricity and Asiacentricity functioning as alternatives to actually decenter Eurocentric thinking?
Countering those who argue for a Latin American multiracial exceptionalism to the black/white binary and white supremacy, these scholars analyze creative writers whose works present conflicting themes of Afrocentricity, blanqueamiento, accommodation and resistance.
Molefi Kete Asante is a professor at Temple University who is well known for his works based on Afrocentricity, a cultural ideology that focuses on the history of black Africans and that rejects Eurocentric and Orientalist attitudes about African people.
Black Ain't looks at the myriad subcultural permutations and categorical debates contained within the concept of "black," examining phenomena like the Creole societies of Louisiana and the Sea Islands, historical shifts in self-naming, and the '90s vogue for populist Afrocentricity.
Our Editor-at-Large, Baffour Ankomah, caught up with him to get his views on Barack Obama's America, the #blacklivesmatter issue, African unity, Afrocentricity and much more.
Where Stepping Came from': Afrocentricity and Beliefs about Stepping.
The CRIS consists 40 items, which includes six types of racial attitudes: pre-encounter assimilation (PA), pre-encounter miseducation (PM), pre-encounter self-hatred (PSH), immersion/ emersion anti-White (IEAW), internalization afrocentricity (IA), and internalization multiculturalist-inclusive (IMCI), each measured by five items that are randomly distributed (30 CRIS items and 10 fillers).
Molefi Asante, Afrocentricity (Trenton, N J: Africa World Press, 1989), p.
The project of this book or what it does well, in an anthology that has no weak chapters, is to provide critical analyses of appropriate elements of Malcolm's life and work: his autobiography, his relationships with key figures, his representation in rap and in Hollywood, his gender dynamics, his rhetorical ways, his Afrocentricity, transnationalism, and black radical politics.
Loosely consisting of A Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul and the Jungle Brothers, the Native Tongues developed a new age take on Afrocentricity, taking inspiration (and samples) from their parents' weirdest records and re-crafting them into a string of legendary albums.