African American

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African American

An American citizen with origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa.

African American

Multiculture A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. See Race.

Patient discussion about African American

Q. does anyone know of any really good salons in germany for african american hair?

A. Germany is quite big, but here (http://www.afrika-start.de/afroshop-lokal.htm
) you can find an "afro-shop" according to your location, and here (http://www.hairfinder.com/salonsgermany.htm) is a list of hair salons sorted by zip code.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Los Angeles: Center for AfroAmerican Studies University of California, 1988.
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of Afroamerican Culture.
CLARK WAS, ACCORDING TO THE LATE AFRICAN-AMERICAN POET TED JOANS, "PERHAPS THE FIRST AFROAMERICAN TO UTILIZE LARGE SCALE CANVASES.
Stephen Ward, a University of Michigan assistant professor in its Center for Afroamerican and African Studies.
performed by an AfroAmerican, and to behold with one's own eyes how in the suite of the Russian tsar there appeared representatives of the African continent.
Baker, Singers of Daybreak: Studies in Black American Literature; Henry Louis Gates, The Signifying Monkey: A Theory of AfroAmerican Literary Criticism; and Juan Bruce-Novoa, Chicano Poetry: A Response to Chaos.
Actor Lennie James, who can currently be seen in the action movie Sahara with Penelope Cruz and Matthew McConaughey, stars in what, at the time of its debut in 1959, was hailed as the greatest AfroAmerican play - the drama which provided a wake-up call to both blacks and whites.
MINTZ, Sidney y Price, Richard, The Birth of Afroamerican Culture, Boston, Beacon Press, 1989.
U of California: Center for AfroAmerican Studies, 1988.
This decision was taken, thanks to the active and positive interventions of African and Afroamerican members participating in the Congress, who underlined the necessity to link better with the too-often "Forgotten continent".
He also read Malcolm X, the autobiography of the US political activist who was a founder of the Organization of AfroAmerican Unity and assassinated for his views in 1965.