Afrikaner

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Afrikaner

Afrikaans name for Bos indicus cattle. Called also Africander.
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cornucopia and change in Afrikanerdom in the 1960s', Journal of Historical Sociology 21(2/3).
It was meant to provide Afrikanerdom with a new sense of identity in the light of the power of British political and cultural hegemony.
Culturally, politically and economically concerted efforts were made by the middle classes to unite a rather disparate constituency of Afrikaans speakers, divided along class and regional lines, under the banner of nationalist Afrikanerdom.
During the 1920s and 1930s, religious, cultural, and political organizations began to proliferate and flourish among the elite and middle-classes as Afrikanerdom sought to craft (some would argue, to recover nostalgically) a sense of community.
Dunbar Moodie, The Rise of Afrikanerdom (Berkeley, 1975), 36.
The real break between Rhodes and Cape Afrikanerdom came soon after when his role as the instigator of Jameson's outrageous coup attempt against the Kruger government was revealed.
Here one sees another publication spotting this information, and with a different set of news values, framing Krog for its purposes as a young dissident voice of promise and hope from within the bastion of Afrikanerdom.
Afrikaner xenophobia and racism (entrenched by the dread of extinction, and consequently driving people into deeper self-absorption) are transformed into compassion for the humiliated and oppressed Other at Ben's perception of inhumanity at the heart of Afrikanerdom.
F Malan, one of the leading theologians who became prime minister of South Africa in 1948 when the National Party came to power, after defeating the Liberal United Parry of General Smuts, adopted this view of history: "The history of the Afrikaner reveals a determination and a definite purpose which make one feel that Afrikanerdom is not the work of man but the creation of God.
Furlong's careful dissection of the different and often shifting political postions within Afrikanerdom is impressive.
Botha came to power, it was obvious that the will to maintain apartheid on the strict basis established by the fanatical Hendrik Verwoerd only thirty years before had been broken in Afrikanerdom and had all but disappeared among English South Africans.
In Dot Serfontein's interpolated history recorded in A Change of Tongue, the Boers are described by the English as "orang-utans" (2003:150), and the cumulative effect of these images is a sense that Krog is situating Afrikanerdom as alterity.