Affluenza


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Affluenza

(1)  A popular term for a dysfunctional family environment in which both parents work or have activities that decrease parenting time
Adverse effects Unsupervised kids/adolescents may drink more, get pregnant, abuse drugs, gamble online.
(2) A condition affecting those living in highly developed societies, which is characterised by an addiction to controlled noise (TV, entertainment); lack of financial control; disintegration of the family and social networks, disconnect with the natural habitat, and living in an artificial environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rosenberg, There's No Defense For Affluenza, PSYCHABLOG (Dec.
Affluenza, on the other hand, can be diagnosed by crying fits and bouts of pouting whenever a child wheedles and pleads to have the latest toy of choice that looks so cool on TV.
Rather, he is repudiating the rich man's feasting in the shadow of his barns of greed (12:19), the kind of affluenza that "all the nations of the world hustle after" (12:30).
In Affluenza Clive Hamilton and Richard Denniss (2005) described how Australia's addiction to luxury goods was distorting the country's moral fabric.
If, for example, you have recently been emailed the popular "What the World Eats" photo essay--juxtaposing pictures of American and European families and their weekly food supplies with pictures of fancifully garbed families in Bhutan, Chad, and other distant, underfed lands--you're seeing a trick essentially drawn from Affluenza.
Owens laments that those churches "have succumbed to affluenza and shape their constituents accordingly.
Affluenza deals with affluence as a consumerist compulsion, while Scorcher covers the manipulations, in the manner of the tobacco lobby, which seek to dampen public concern about climate change.
Affluenza is "the affliction of being too focused [?
The amount of debt keeps rising so it seems that we'll be suffering from affluenza for a while to come.
From shopaholics and bankruptcies to those seeking meaning in material goods, AFFLUENZA details the process of recovery from physical and cultural clutter, and offers both personal and political remedies for the problem.
First coined by author John de Graaf to describe the American problem of over-consumption, the Australian affluenza epidemic has now been exposed by Clive Hamilton and Richard Dennis of the Australia Institute in their new book Affluenza--When too much is never enough.
Dr Clive Hamilton is co-author, with Richard Denniss, of Affluenza (Allen & Unwin 2005).