affinity

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affinity

 [ah-fin´ĭ-te]
1. attraction; a tendency to seek out or unite with another object or substance.
2. in chemistry, the tendency of two substances to form strong or weak chemical bonds forming molecules or complexes.
3. in immunology, the thermodynamic bond strength of an antigen-antibody complex.

af·fin·i·ty (A),

(ă-fin'i-tē),
1. In chemistry, the force that impels certain atoms or molecules to bind to or unite with certain other atoms or molecules to form complexes or compounds; chemical attraction.
2. Selective staining of a tissue by a dye or the selective uptake of a dye, chemical, or other substance by a tissue.
3. In psychology and psychiatry, a positive bond or relatedness between people or groups, or a person's positive regard for an object, idea, or activity; a positive cathexis.
4. In immunology, the strength of interaction between an antigen binding site and an antigenic determinant.
5. A biomolecular interaction exhibiting specificity.
[L. affinis, neighboring, fr. ad, to, + finis, end, boundary]

affinity

(ə-fĭn′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. affini·ties
a. An attraction or force between particles or chemicals that causes them to combine.
b. The degree to which particles or chemicals are likely to combine: Hemoglobin has a high affinity for oxygen. Also called avidity.

Affinity

(1) An inherent relationship.
(2) A special attraction for a specific element, organ, or structure.
Chemistry
(1) The intensity of a force that binds atoms in molecules; the tendency of substances to combine by a chemical reaction.
(2) The strength of noncovalent binds between two substances, as measured by the dissociation constant of the complex.
(3) The reciprocal of the dissociation constant.
Developmental biology The degree to which one substance is attracted to another.
Immunology
(1) A thermodynamic expression of the strength of the interaction between a single antigen binding site and a single antigenic determinant (and thus of the stereochemical compatibility between them), most accurately applied to interactions among simple, uniform antigenic determinants such as haptens.
(2) The sum of the strengths of multiple binding sites between an antibody and an antigen, which increased stability of the linkage, as measured by the association or affinity constant.

af·fin·i·ty

(ă-fin'i-tē)
1. chemistry The force that impels certain atoms to unite with certain others.
2. Selective staining of a tissue by a dye.
3. The strength of binding between a Fab site of an antibody and an antigenic determinant.
4. In a general sense, an attraction.
[L. affinis, neighboring, fr. ad, to, + finis, end, boundary]

affinity

The strength of binding between a receptor, such as an ANTIGEN binding site on an antibody, and a LIGAND, such as an EPITOPE on an antigen.

affinity

  1. the relationship of one organism to another in terms of its evolution.
  2. the strength of binding between molecules, for example an ANTIBODY and an ANTIGEN.
References in periodicals archive ?
Affinitive interaction was more noticed in the female population than in wild with (P a$?
The behavioural patterns of musk deer during the non-mating season Behaviour Female Bedding, BE 42.32 [+ or -] 11.35 Standing-gazing, SG 67.38 [+ or -] 12.69 Moving, MO 27.41 [+ or -] 5.00 Ingesting, IN 52.37 [+ or -] 10.05 Ruminating, RU 77.25 [+ or -] 15.25 Tail rubbing, TR -- Urinating/defecating, UD 7.20 [+ or -] 2.88 Self-directed behaviour, SD 2.57 [+ or -] 1.88 Environmental sniffing, ES 14.48 [+ or -] 4.83 Ano-genital sniffing, AS 0.24 [+ or -] 0.13 Affinitive interaction, AI 7.89 [+ or -] 4.81 Agonistic interaction, CI 0.57 [+ or -] 0.26 Behaviour Male Sig.
How receivers respond to submissive or affinitive signals may not influence the receiver's fitness itself if there is high asymmetry in social status between signalers (subordinates) and receivers (dominants).
In its original inception, the Senate was constructed as the body more affinitive with the Federalist fear of pure democracy and a filtering notion of elite representation.
Two years and twelve days after departing England for his continental tour, Lord Byron landed at Sheerness on 14 July 1811 bearing the manuscript about to rocket him into international fame.(1) It tracks the months of recurrent dislocation intrinsic to a pilgrimage that enacted the chronic discontinuity of the poet's affinitive history.
Likewise, prostaglandin G/H synthase 2 (PTGS2, degree = 56) displayed the most affinitive connections with compounds, followed by gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit alpha-1 (GABRA1, degree = 48), prostaglandin G/H synthase 1 (PTGS1, degree = 37), and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1 (CHRM1, degree = 37).
Vitangcol also intentionally hid his affinitive relationship with Soriano, which would have automatically disqualified PH Trams.
When she asked for further examples, I doubt she had in mind this many, but she had stumbled, literally through the back door, into an area I've been going at for awhile I call Definitive Homophones (DH), where a homophone of the whole target word or phrase is a synonym or strong affinitive. I plan to present them at a later date.
There are many factors affecting the affinitive, adsorption, coordinating capabilities of chelating resins toward metal ions.
In addition, working with the limited selection of textual variations in appendix Il of Wagner's article (in which he compared the "received text" of Wang Pi with the Sung edition of Fan Ying-yuan and to which I added the relevant readings from the extant recensions of Ho-shang kung and Fu I), I determined that of the total of ninety-four variations among these sources there was at least affinitive agreement (identical but for a radical) between the Wang and Ho readings in seventy-two (seven affinitives; the rest identical) of them (and between the Fu and Fan readings in sixty-seven of them).