afferent

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Related to Afferents: Afferent fibers, afferent pathway

afferent

 [af´er-ent]
1. conveying toward a center; called also centripetal. See also efferent and corticipetal.
2. something that so conducts, as an afferent fiber or nerve.
afferent loop syndrome chronic partial obstruction of the proximal loop (duodenum and jejunum) after gastrojejunostomy, resulting in duodenal distention, pain, and nausea following ingestion of food.

af·fer·ent

(af'ĕr-ĕnt), Do not confuse this word with efferent. Avoid the mispronunciation ā'fe-rent, sometimes adopted to emphasize the contrast with efferent.
Inflowing; conducting toward a center, denoting certain arteries, veins, lymphatics, and nerves. Opposite of efferent.
Synonym(s): centripetal (1) , esodic
[L. afferens, fr. af-fero, to bring to]

afferent

(ăf′ər-ənt)
adj.
Carrying inward to a central organ or section, as nerves that conduct impulses from the periphery of the body to the brain or spinal cord.

af′fer·ent·ly adv.

Afferent

adjective Referring to the centripetal movement of blood or nerve impulses—e.g., through the veins toward the heart, or nerves to the brain.
noun A blood vessel or nerve that centripetally conveys flow or an impulse.

afferent

adjective
1. Conveying or transmitting.
2. Referring to the movement of blood or nerve impulses centrally–eg, through vessels toward the heart, or nerves to the brain, Cf Efferent.

af·fer·ent

(af'ĕr-ĕnt)
Inflowing; conducting toward a center, denoting certain arteries, veins, lymphatics, and nerves. Opposite of efferent
Synonym(s): centripetal (1) .
[L. afferens, fr. af-fero, to bring to]

afferent

Directed toward a central organ or part, as in the case of sensory nerves that carry impulses to the spinal cord and brain.

Afferent

Refers to peripheral nerves that transmit signals to the spinal cord and the brain. These nerves carry out sensory function.
Mentioned in: Peripheral Neuropathy

afferent 

Carrying from the periphery to the central or the main structure. See efferent.

af·fer·ent

(af'ĕr-ĕnt)
Inflowing; conducting toward a center. Opposite of efferent.
Synonym(s): centripetal (1) .
[L. afferens, fr. af-fero, to bring to]

Patient discussion about afferent

Q. where do depression comes from?

A. from the deep and dark corners of the soul... depression today is considered an mental illness with fatalities. the causes usually a tragedy or misshapes in life that makes you fill worthless and can even lead to suicidal thoughts. it's a curable condition our days.

Q. where do depression comes from?

A. Depression is very common, and at least 16% of the population is said to experience an episode of depression at least once in their life. It is known that genetic predisposition has a lot to do with developing depression and other psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, but the exact gene is unknown and some triggers may influence a person to have a depressive episode even if there is no one in their family who is suffering from it (for instance- stress, work and needing to deal with trauma or distress).

Q. How come it’s possible? my child with autism is undergoing different therapies for many years……recently I got the information that he may have got autism by maternal antibodies ……how come it’s possible?

A. There are many triggering reasons for autism like metabolic, genetic, and environmental. Now it can also get triggered by maternal antibodies. The maternal antibodies which crosses the placenta, can affect the brain tissue of the fetus which can adversely affect the baby`s brain development & cause autism.

More discussions about afferent
References in periodicals archive ?
TRPA1 presents on afferent nerves, which can detect and react to potentially damage, such as stress, physical and chemical stimuli.
Cutaneomotor integration in human hand motor areas: somatotopic effect and interaction of afferents. Exp Brain Res 2001; 141:232-241.
(1) The peripheral pathway: noxious stimuli act on the receptors in the GI mucosa and are transmitted from primary afferent nerve fibers to primary sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia(DRG).
Kerr, "Central relationships of trigeminal and cervical primary afferents in the spinal cord and medulla," Brain Research, vol.
Increased NGF has been demonstrated in the bladder, dorsal root ganglia, and spinal cord following SCI, and administration of exogenous NGF to the bladder or spinal cord can in animals induce detrusor overactivity and increase bladder afferent neuron excitability [4, 13].
Synbiotic nourishment research by Bengmark supports my earlier synbiotic nutrient research on the importance of biomolecular nutrient and cell polarity formats that are critical to adequately nourish stem cell niches, the gut habitat, and afferent regenerative functions.
In the first experiment, they recorded afferent responses to a variety of frequencies in rhesus macaques, whose tactile nervous system closely resembles humans.
It has been suggested that SNM inhibits bladder afferent activities through its action on somatic afferent pathways and thereby blocks abnormal sensory input to the spinal cord and brain.[sup.2] SNM has become more appealing because of simpler, minimally invasive implant techniques and shorter hospital stay.
Development of CNS afferents and early properties of the
While the motor output associated with human walking is thought to be largely generated by spinal centers, both supraspinal and afferent input contribute considerably to the locomotor output.3 Considerable evidence derived from both animal and human experiments suggests that specific afferent input to the spinal cord such as hip proprioceptors, Group-I muscle afferents and plantar cutaneous afferents play a significant role in modulating reflex transmission during walking and standing.
Reciprocal Ia inhibition involves Ia sensory afferents from the muscle spindle.