Affected Pregnancy

Affected Pregnancy

A term of art referring to a pregnancy in which the fetus has a “target” condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is of concern that todays blood folate results show that 81% and 79% of women of childbearing age in Scotland and Wales respectively are below the threshold for increased risk of an NTD affected pregnancy which reinforces the case for action.
It is not known whether fever might have affected pregnancy outcomes among these pregnant women with Zika virus infection.
On average, the likelihood that a screen positive result actually represents an affected pregnancy may be less than 5%.
22 July 2014 - UK technology and product development company Sagentia Group plc (LON:SAG) said yesterday it had partnered with domestic molecular diagnostics firm Premaitha Health on the development of the latter's IONA test, aimed to be the first non-invasive in-vitro diagnostic (IVD) product for prenatal screening to identify the likelihood of a trisomy affected pregnancy.
The report brought to the forefront the concept of likelihood ratios, the estimation of a woman's risk of having an affected pregnancy, and the method of estimating screening performance with several screening markers simultaneously.
Acculturation, believed to increase awareness of racial stereotyping, has negatively affected pregnancy outcomes of ethnic minority women.
We also wanted to track how the virus affected pregnancy by studying the outcomes," Anderson said.
The three groups were composed as follows: 95 women with a pregnancy affected by a NTD (mean age 27 years) and 265 controls with a normal pregnancy (mean age 28 years); 107 women who had had a previous pregnancy affected by an NTD but were pregnant again with an unaffected pregnancy (mean age 32 years) and 414 controls (mean age 28 years); and 76 women during an affected pregnancy (mean age 27 years) and 222 controls (mean age 28 years).
Until now, couples in whom one person was a dominant carrier of this adult-onset colorectal cancer had to wait for prenatal tests to confirm an affected pregnancy and then make the decision about termination.
However, study participants stated that they felt that terminating an affected pregnancy was preferable to giving birth to an affected child and they would choose the same course of action in another pregnancy.
At the moment there is no reliable means of prevention and no treatment which can normalise an affected pregnancy.