Aeromonas hydrophila


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Aer·o·mo·nas hy·dro·ph'i·la

a bacterial species that causes cellulitis, wound infections, acute diarrhea (waterborne and shellfish associated), septicemia, and urinary tract infections in humans. Also causes red leg disease in frogs. The type species of Aeromonas.

Aeromonas hydrophila

A type of species of the genus Aeromonas, which is an opportunistic pathogen that affects children and immunocompromised hosts.
Epidemiology A hydrophila’s natural habitat is water and soil.
Clinical findings Acute diarrhoea, cellulitis, sepsis in immunocompromised hosts.
Pathogenesis Diarrhoea is caused by a cytotoxic enterotoxin.
Management Chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, newer quinolones, third-generation cephalosporins.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, it has been shown that Aeromonas hydrophila and Citrobacter freundii, were the cause of fish injuries and mortality of naturally infected silver catfish, and Raoultella ornithinolytica was the cause of human intoxication by histamine due to the consumption of contaminated fish (KANKI et al., 2002; BANDEIRA JUNIOR et al., 2017).
Nya and Austin (2009) used different diets with garlic supplementation against Aeromonas hydrophila in rainbow trout (Oncorhyncus mykiss) and found significant results in FCR and weight gain in experimental fish.
These explanations are compatible with the results of cytotoxic effect on RD and L20B caused by supernatant of Aeromonas hydrophila (Al-Rubai et al., 2011).
Isolation of Aeromonas hydrophila from infected ornamental fish hatchery during massive disease outbreak.
oleifera extract against Aeromonas hydrophila infections and transportation-induced stress in O.
Dr Macdonald believes aeromonas hydrophila could also be the cause of the disease dubbed "dogs' black death".
A new type of Aeromonas hydrophila bacterium, first reported in 2009, has been devastating the catfish industry to the tune of $10 million per year in fish losses and treatment costs.
Follansbee et al., "Postprandial Aeromonas hydrophila cultures and antibiotic levels of enteric aspirates from medicinal leeches applied to patients receiving antibiotics," Annals of Plastic Surgery, vol.