cellular respiration

(redirected from Aerobic glycolysis)
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Related to Aerobic glycolysis: Anaerobic glycolysis

cellular respiration

n.
The series of metabolic processes by which living cells produce energy through the oxidation of organic substances.

cellular respiration

or

cell respiration

a catabolic process (see CATABOLISM) occurring in cells where complex organic molecules are broken down to release energy for other cellular processes. Cell respiration usually occurs in the presence of oxygen (see AEROBIC RESPIRATION) but some organisms can respire without oxygen (see ANAEROBIC RESPIRATION).
References in periodicals archive ?
For each person, the researchers determined the fraction of sugar committed to aerobic glycolysis in various regions of the brain.
LPS-activated dendritic cells and M1-like activated macrophages show enhanced aerobic glycolysis, flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, and fatty acid synthesis but have incomplete OXPHOS at the level of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and isocitrate dehydrogenase, blocking the synthesis of mitochondrial ATP.
Phosphoproteomic results are in agreement with the prevalence of aerobic glycolysis in lines #61 and #74 of cluster 2.
Caption: Figure 1: A model of interactions between the canonical Wnt/beta- catenin pathway and PPAR gamma under aerobic glycolysis conditions in colon cancer.
[129] suggest that cancer cells stimulate aerobic glycolysis in CAFs.
Aerobic glycolysis in the human brain is associated with development and neotenous gene expression.
This type of molecule might have the potential to inhibit or reverse aerobic glycolysis in cancer, an intriguing, but still unproven, approach to cancer chemotherapy.
Increased levels of HIF-1 resulting in upregulation of its target proteins equip clear-cell RCC cells with a specific set of enzymatic machinery that favours aerobic glycolysis over oxidative phosphorylation.[sup.8] One of the genes controlled by HIF-1 (because it contains an HRE site) is glucose transporter 1 (Glut1), which encodes a membrane transporter of glucose.
A high aerobic capacity is beneficial to a performer in an anaerobic event as it will aid a faster recovery between bouts of high-intensity exercise and provide a greater amount of ATP via aerobic glycolysis.
Catabolic efficiency of aerobic glycolysis: the Warburg effect revisited.
Many cancers seem to employ aerobic glycolysis as their metabolic programme of choice to fulfil their bioenergetic and anabolic requirements for rapid growth and enhance their survival in response to microenvironmental stress [11-15].
From there, glucose 6-phosphate can be used as a substrate by aerobic glycolysis or by the pentose-phosphate pathway (PPP).