Aedes albopictus


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Related to Aedes albopictus: genus Aedes, Aedes vexans

A·e·des al·bo·pic·'tus

mosquito species widespread in Pacific basin; recently seen in the Americas; an important vector of dengue fever and likely also of West Nile virus.

Aedes albopictus

A mosquito of the family Culicidae, which is a vector for dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever, Japanese encephalitis, LaCrosse encephalitis, yellow fever viruses, and eastern, western, and Venezuelan encephalitides..
References in periodicals archive ?
Blood-feeding behavior of Aedes albopictus, a vector of chikungunya on La Reunion.
Aedes albopictus was found to be the predominant species collected.
Studies dealing with competition between the larvae of two invasive species of mosquito, Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae), have shown that Aedes albopicus is the better competitor under most environments.
Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, is one of the most invasive mosquito species known and a vector for at least 22 viruses, including West Nile virus and dengue.
I describe here an application of a video technique used to study the behavioural time budgets of the larvae of three mosquito species, namely Aedes albopictus, Culex pipiens and Anopheles stephensi.
The range of Aedes albopictus ('Asian tiger mosquito'), a secondary dengue vector related to the classical vector, Aedes aegypti, has been expanding globally at an alarming rate.
DMRC's recent studies on reporting vertical transmission of dengue virus by Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes from desert Rajasthan, have revealed a crucial observation that the vertically transmitted virus from mosquito generations marks the precursor of appearance of dengue infection in a family and this is then followed up by human to human transmission to aggravate the infection first at family and then at community level (DMRC, Unpublished reports).
Copies of Aedes albopictus infestation reports were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
This was especially important because Aedes albopictus, the Asian Tiger mosquito, became established in Texas in 1985 (Sprenger and Wuithiranyagool, 1986) and has since spread throughout the United States (Hawley, 1988).