adverse action

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Adverse Action

Any of a number of measures—e.g., reprimands, sanctions, censure or other negative action—taken against a doctor or professional.
Adverse actions include any of the following: staff privileges involuntarily reduced, withheld, suspended, voluntarily surrendered, resigned, or revoked, or subject to any special provisions, including denial; restrictions; fine; need for counselling, monitoring, medical or psychological evaluation; probation; loss in whole or part; suspension; termination or refused participation with an insurance plan; issuance of a letter of concern; guidance; censure, or reprimand; administrative letter, expiration of privileges without renewal; nonrenewal; being subjected to disciplinary action or other similar actions or limitations; voluntary or involuntary surrender of licensure or status to avoid or in anticipation of any of the above listed disciplinary actions, regardless of whether said action is or may be reportable to the National Practitioner Data Bank or any other officially sanctioned or required registry.

adverse action

Medical malpractice Any of a number of professional reprimands or sanctions. See Incompetence, National Practitioner Data Bank, Staff privileges.
References in periodicals archive ?
Congress should move more cautiously in connection with labor management relations and adverse actions and appeals reforms.
If employees meet these requirements, the employer must show good cause for the adverse action. This includes either a valid rationale that is not related to the employee's disability or a rationale related to the disability that is acceptable under the ADA.
State medical boards, professional societies, and health care organizations must report adverse actions they take against a physician that affect the practitioner's clinical privileges for more than 30 days.
The adverse action reporting mandate drew some fire from Dale Atkinson, NABP's general counsel.
In 1996, Congress extended disclosure and other FCRA obligations to apartment owners and managers who take "adverse action," such as denying residency, against residents, employees, and other parties based on "consumer reports."
Initially, there must be proof that the individual who took the adverse action was aware of the protected activity, as the law presumes there can be no proximate cause if the employer's representative knows of no reason to retaliate.[43] From a timing standpoint, it almost goes with out saying that adverse actions which predate a protected activity cannot be causally related.[44]
1088 creating a national database of "final adverse actions" - criminal convictions, civil judgments, negative licensing actions, and so on - taken against healthcare providers, suppliers, and practitioners.
Professional societies must report adverse actions regarding members.
Adverse actions and performance-based actions; process, law and cases, guidance, and pitfalls.
If justice is to be served, courts must question the basis for adverse actions taken against physicians, and not simply perpetuate the fraud by accepting a hospital's word that what was done was legitimate peer review.
It does not include elements of the new system involving labor relations, collective bargaining, independent third-party review, adverse actions, and the National Security Labor Relations Board.