AHS-2

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AHS-2

Adventist Health Study-2. A health survey of the Seventh-Day Adventists, a sect of Christians who abstain from alcohol and tobacco and embrace a largely healthy lifestyle, and are often vegetarian as well. As of 2006, nearly 97,000 were enrolled in the survey.
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This study is part of the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2), a prospective cohort study of approximately 96,000 Seventh-day Adventist men and women in the United States and Canada.
In one study, based on data from the Adventist Health Study-2, researchers found that vegan diets had the greatest protection against type 2 diabetes compared to non-vegan diets, even when they accounted for other lifestyle factors and body fat levels, though all types of vegetarian diets offered some protection compared to non-vegetarian diets.
Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) is even more ambitious in scope.
(1) Adventist Health Study-2, (2) Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle, and Disease Prevention, and (3) Center for Community Resilience, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, USA
Vegetarian diets and blood pressure among white subjects: results from the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2).
Significant differences in body mass index (BMI) levels, ranging from 24.1 for vegans to 28.3 for non-vegetarians (findings derived from the Adventist Health Study-2), may result from differences in energy absorption and use.
The Adventist Health Study-2 also found that- Vegans are, on average, 30 pounds lighter than meat eaters.
The study, which analyzed data from 2,818 subjects participating in the Adventist Health Study-1 and Adventist Health Study-2 over a 26-year period, also showed that a high consumption of cooked green vegetables and dried fruit was also associated with greater protection.
She is currently a project editor for the Adventist Health Study-2, a long-term study funded by the U.S.
The Adventist Health Study-2 includes more than 89,000 adult Seventh-day Adventist participants whose diets range from vegan to nonvegetarian.
Further evidence about the eco benefits of plant-based eating emerged from a review of data from the Adventist Health Study-2, which included more than 73,000 participants.

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