astringent

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Related to Adstringens: astringent

astringent

 [ah-strin´jent]
1. causing contraction or arresting discharges.
2. an agent that causes contraction or arrests discharges, usually locally after topical application. Astringents act as protein precipitants and arrest discharge by causing shrinkage of tissue. Skin preparations such as shaving lotions often contain astringents such as aluminum acetate that help to reduce oiliness and excessive perspiration. Witch hazel is a common household astringent used to reduce swelling. Styptic pencils, used to stop bleeding from small cuts, contain astringents. Zinc oxide and calamine are astringents used in lotions, powders, and ointments to relieve itching and chafing in various forms of dermatitis. Some astringents, such as tannic acid, have been used in treating diarrhea; others, such as boric acid and sodium borate, help relieve the symptoms of inflammation of the mucous membranes of the throat or conjunctiva of the eye. Astringents have some bacteriostatic properties, though they are not generally used as antiseptics.

as·trin·gent

(as-trin'jent),
1. Causing contraction or shrinkage of the tissues, arrest of secretion, or control of bleeding.
2. An agent having these effects.
[L. astringens]

astringent

/astrin·gent/ (ah-strin´jent)
1. causing contraction, usually locally after topical application.
2. an agent that so acts.

astringent

(ə-strĭn′jənt)
adj.
Medicine Tending to draw together or constrict tissues; styptic.
n.
A substance or preparation, such as alum, that draws together or constricts body tissues and is effective in stopping the flow of blood or other secretions.

as·trin′gen·cy n.
as·trin′gent·ly adv.

astringent

[əstrin′jənt]
Etymology: Gk, astringere, to tighten
1 a substance that causes contraction of tissues on application, usually used locally.
2 having the quality of an astringent. astringency, n.

astringent

adjective Causing local contraction after topical application.
 
Herbal medicine
noun Any herb that hardens and contracts tissues due to its high tannin content, preventing bacterial penetration and inhibiting discharges, diarrhoea and haemorrhage.

Pharmacology
A topical agent (e.g., aluminum-based compounds) that can be variably used: as topical haemostatics, to precipitate proteins, reduce mucosal inflammation, toughen skin, promote healing, as antiseptics, and to act as antiperspirants.

astringent

adjective Causing local contraction after topical application noun Pharmacology A topical agent–eg, aluminum-based compounds, used to precipitate proteins, as topical hemostatics, to ↓ mucosal inflammation, toughen skin, promote healing, as antiseptics, and as an antiperspirant

as·trin·gent

(ă-strin'jĕnt)
1. Causing contraction of the tissues, arrest of secretion, or control of bleeding.
2. An agent having these effects.
[L. astringens]

astringent

1. A drug that shrinks cells and tightens surfaces by denaturing cell protein.
2. Having the property of tightening surfaces.

astringent,

n a substance that contracts or tightens tissue, thereby alleviating conditions such as diarrhea, hemorrhages, and secretions.

astringent 

A chemical substance that causes contraction of soft organic tissues by precipitating proteins from their surfaces. Astringents are incorporated into some artificial tears. Examples: acetylcysteine, witch hazel, zinc sulfate. See artificial tears.

as·trin·gent

(ă-strin'jĕnt)
1. Causing contraction or shrinkage of the tissues, arrest of secretion, or control of bleeding.
2. An agent having these effects.
[L. astringens]

astringent

1. causing contraction or arresting discharges.
2. an agent that causes contraction or arrests discharges. Astringents act as protein precipitants; they arrest discharge by causing shrinkage of tissue.
Some astringents, such as tannic acid, have been used in treating diarrhea; others, such as boric acid and sodium borate, help relieve the symptoms of inflammation of the mucous membranes of the throat or conjunctiva of the eye. Skin lotions often contain astringents such as aluminum acetate that help to reduce oiliness and excessive perspiration. Witch hazel is a common household astringent used to reduce swelling. Styptic pencils, used to stop bleeding from small cuts, contain astringents. Zinc oxide and calamine are astringents used in lotions, powders and ointments to relieve itching and chafing in various forms of dermatitis. Astringents have some bacteriostatic properties, though they are not generally used as antiseptics.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study suggests that seasonal accumulation of tannins in Stryphnodendron adstringens with the highest contents in the rainy season is dependent on carbon skeletons produced in the photosynthetic process.
adstringens (Tabela 1), a porcentagem de plantulas anormais nao foi afetada por nenhum dos tratamentos testados e para S.
Valores promedio del crecimiento en grosor de corteza para el area descortezada y la corteza original, en arboles de cuachalalate (Amphipterygium adstringens Schiede ex Schlecht.
adstringens e continuaram recebendo o substituto de polen ad libidum semanalmente em alimentadores coletivos situados ao centro de cada apiario ate o final da floracao.
The acetone soluble fraction from bark extract of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart.
Diante da sua demanda como produto florestal nao madeireiro e da forte ameaca a essa especie, devido a sua exploracao de forma predatoria, objetivou-se caracterizar a populacao da Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart.
When we analysed each species separately, our visits and measurements altered herbivory damage significantly in four species: for Connarus suberosus, an increase in herbivory in the control, for Diospyros hispida, an increase at low visitation intensity, for Eriotheca gracilipes, an increase at medium visitation intensity, and for Stryphnodendron adstringens, an increase at high visitation intensity (Table 2).
Oligomers and polymers of prodelphinidins and procyanidins (proanthocyanidins, PAs) are frequent natural products that are contained in many medicinal plants, like Stryphnodendron adstringens (deMello et al.