adsorption

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Related to Adsorbtion: Adsorption chromatography

adsorption

 [ad-sorp´shun]
the action of a substance in attracting and holding other materials or particles on its surface; see also absorption.
attachment (def. 2).

ad·sorp·tion

(ad-sōrp'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with absorption.
The property of a solid substance of attracting and holding to its surface a gas, liquid, or a substance in solution or in suspension, for example, condensation of a gas onto a surface. Compare: absorption.
[L. ad, to, + sorbeo, to suck up]

adsorption

/ad·sorp·tion/ (ad-sorp´shun) the action of a substance in attracting and holding other materials or particles on its surface.

adsorption

[adsôrp′shən]
Etymology: L, ad + sorbere, to suck in
a natural process whereby molecules of a gas or liquid adhere to the surface of a solid. The phenomenon depends on an assortment of factors such as surface tension and electrical charges. Many biological reactions involve adsorption. Adsorption is the principle on which chromatography is based and which allows for the separation of a mixture into component fractions for qualitative analysis. See also chromatography. adsorb, v.

Adsorption

Chemistry An accumulation/concentration of molecules of a gas or liquid on a surface interfacing with the gas or liquid, resulting in a relatively high surface concentration.
Histology The accumulation of a substance on a surface affected by the affinities of acids to bases—and vice versa—based on electrical attraction; adsorption may explain differential affinity for dyes that occurs in histologic preparations of tissues being examined by light microscopy.
Immunology The removal of nonspecific agglutinins, by incubating the fluid of interest in a serum—e.g., of bovine origin—which lacks the antigens to be measured.
Virology The adhesion of a substance to an organic particle in a solution—e.g., adhesion of a virus to a cell.

ad·sorp·tion

(ad-sōrp'shŭn)
The property of a solid substance to attract and hold to its surface a gas, liquid, or a substance in solution or in suspension.
Compare: absorption
[L. ad, to, + sorbeo, to suck in]

adsorption

The process by which a substance, such as a gas or dissolved solid, is attracted to, and adheres to, a surface.

adsorption

the taking up of gas or liquid by a surface or interface. In physical adsorption, molecules are held by VAN DER WAAL'S FORCES of attraction; in chemical adsorption there is exchange or sharing of electrons. Compare ABSORPTION.

Adsorption

The binding of a chemical (e.g., drug or poison) to a solid material such as activated charcoal or clay.
Mentioned in: Charcoal, Activated

adsorption,

n a process in which gaseous material builds up on the outermost layer of a solid and forms a light film.

ad·sorp·tion

(ad-sōrp'shŭn) Do not confuse this word with absorption.
The property of a solid substance of attracting and holding to its surface a gas, liquid, or a substance in solution or in suspension.
[L. ad, to, + sorbeo, to suck in]

adsorption,

n a natural process whereby molecules of a gas or liquid adhere to the surface of a solid.

adsorption

the action of a substance in attracting and holding other materials or particles on its surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
A compact adsorbtion refrigerator was said to operate silently without a compressor or fan.
I have assumed here that substantial equivalence exists between the different ways of conducting the assay, but individual cases of one species of rodent being more sensitive than the other can be anticipated, just as the use of different routes of administration may modulate some assay responses due to differences in the adsorbtion, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of the chemical.
The entire pathway is generally treated to minimize adsorbtion of sulfur on system surfaces.
Solvents such as xylene, are removed in a carbon adsorbtion system and transferred into the desorption air stream for ultimate destruction.