adoption

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adoption

[ədop′shən]
Etymology: L, adoptere, to choose
a selection and inclusion in an established relationship or a choice of treatment protocol.

Adoption

The act of lawfully assuming the parental rights and responsibilities of another person, usually a child under age 18, typically due to infertility; 8,000 babies/year enter the US adoption pool, most from underdeveloped countries; about 2% of children < age 18 in the US are adopted.
Health profile Adoptees comprise 5% of children in psychotherapy, 6–9% of those with learning disabilities, 10–15% of those in residential treatment or psychiatric hospitals.
Medical problems in international adoptees
• Infections Giardia lamblia, Trichuris trichiura, Blastocystis hominis, tuberculosis, HBV, chronic diarrhoea, poor hygiene
• Medical problems Neurologic, haematologic, renal, metabolic
• Psychological Sensory deprivation and/or physical abuse by care-givers
• Nutrition Malnutrition, rickets

adoption

Social medicine The act of lawfully assuming the parental rights and responsibilities of another person, usually a child under the age of 18; the care and nurturing of a child by a non-blood-related adult who assumes the roles, rights, and obligations of a natural parent; 2% of children < age 18–US are adopted–± 1 million. See Cooperative adoption, Designated adoption, Independent adoption, Infant adoption, Informal adoption, Open adoption, Relative adoption, Semiadoption, Simple adoption, Traditional adoption, Transracial adoption, Wrongful adoption, Zygote adoption.

adoption

1. of alien young. Individual dams of all species may adopt strange neonates, and some ewes will even attempt to poach from others, but special measures have to be taken in most cases to foster alien young. Sows are probably the easiest to deceive. Queens will accept foster kittens if they are within about 2 weeks of the age of their own kittens. Reluctant ewes may accept strange lambs only if they are rubbed with secretions from their own.
2. also used in reference to the placing of stray or otherwise unwanted dogs and cats into ownership, as stray animals obtained from an animal shelter.
References in periodicals archive ?
124) The statute states, in part, that "an adopted person is the child of an adopting parent and not of the natural parents," which would eliminate any possible argument that Sherri could bring under Missouri adoption statutes.
060 eliminated that argument, as it states, "[F]or purposes of intestate succession, a relationship of parent and child must be established to determine succession by, through, or from a person, an adopted person is the child of an adopting parent and not of the natural parents.
the courts were willing to allow the adopting parent to create an heir for himself, they refused to allow the adopting parent to make himself an heir, partly because the 1857 Act was unclear on this point, and partly because of a desire to prevent possible predatory adoption.
Though no one has heard of such a case, adopting parents still fear the possibility.
The adopting parents can usually avoid the emotional drama of interacting with the birth mother, for example, and the domestic danger that she'll decide to keep the child.
Not only did overseas adoptions not cease, but DFA officials acknowledged that there was no legal basis for them to deny passports for children to travel abroad, so long as the children and adopting parents met Archbishop McQuaid's 1950 regulations:
Now adopting parents can be as young as 30, they are also allowed to have one child of their own.
The first pair of adopting parents, Richard and Vickie Allen of San Diego, filed suit in Arkansas seeking to void the twins' subsequent adoption there by the Kilshaws, of Buckley, Wales.
Karen Ullman, a staff attorney for Public Counsel, a nonprofit organization that provides free representation to adopting parents to finalize adoptions, said that waiting for documents to arrive in the mail is just one of several problems families face trying to adopt through the county foster care system.
We cannot stress enough that adopting parents need to engage an agency with qualified people who travel extensively to these countries and know the laws.
Gager shows that parent(s) giving up children often transferred funds to the adopting parents to help defray some of the latters' expenses, though children tended to pass from less to more affluent homes.
While adopting parents have answered the needs of thousands of Irish children, they can never answer the questions deep within us all of: "Who am I?