tramadol

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Related to Adolan: Tramadol

analgesic

 [an″al-je´zik]
1. relieving pain.
2. pertaining to analgesia.
3. an agent that relieves pain without causing loss of consciousness.
narcotic analgesic opioid analgesic.
nonsteroidal antiinflammatory analgesic (NSAIA) nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug.
opiate analgesic (opioid analgesic) any of a class of compounds that bind with a number of closely related specific receptors (opioid receptors) in the central nervous system to block the perception of pain or affect the emotional response to pain; such compounds include opium and its derivatives, as well as a number of synthetic compounds, and are used for moderate to severe pain. Chronic administration or abuse may lead to dependence.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tra·ma·dol

(trah'mă-dol),
An analgesic drug with a mechanism of action that is unusual in that one optic isomer exerts typical opioid-type effects and the other isomer interacts with the reuptake and/or release of norepinephrine and serotonin in nerve terminals.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tramadol

(trăm′ə-dôl′)
n.
A synthetic analgesic, C16H25NO2, used in its hydrochloride form to treat moderate to moderately severe pain. It is structurally similar to codeine and has both opioid and nonopioid effects.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tramadol

Ultram® Pharmacology An analgesic Adverse effects Constipation, N&V, vertigo, headache, somnolence, anaphylactoid reactions, drug abuse, seizures
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tramadol

A centrally-acting synthetic opiate pain-killing drug. It is less likely to cause respiratory depression, constipation, euphoria and addiction than many of the ipioid agonists. It is currently the fourth most commonly prescribed analgesic in the world. Brand names are Tramake, Zamadol and Zydol.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005