Admissible Evidence

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Admissible Evidence

Any item, exhibit, object, material, or recording which a local, district, or federal court will accept as linking an alleged actor to an act.
Examples A knife belonging to the accused, covered with the victim's blood; the uttering of the killer’s name by a dying victim is admissible in some jurisdictions (Michigan, California, Washington, D.C., and the state of Washington).
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Law, Cherry-Picking Memories: Why Neuroimaging-Based Lie Detection Requires a New Framework for the Admissibility of Scientific Evidence under FRE 702 and Daubert, 14 YALE J.
In 1993, the Supreme Court relaxed the standard of admissibility of scientific evidence and expert testimony in Daubert v.
81) Additionally, the trial judge was expressly made the "gatekeeper" for resolving these evidentiary questions and was charged with determining the admissibility of scientific evidence and barring "junk science" from entry.
O'Connor, Admissibility of Scientific Evidence Under Daubert, MegaLinks in Criminal Justice, http://faculty.
The North Carolina Supreme Court has expressly rejected the federal standard for admissibility of scientific evidence established by the U.
In 1993, in the Daubert case, the Supreme Court outlined the current test for the admissibility of scientific evidence in the federal courts.
Under the law of evidence, trial courts must evaluate the admissibility of scientific evidence.
Merrill Dow Pharmaceuticals involved the admissibility of scientific evidence as presented by expert witnesses.
Courts that were unwilling to use Frye adopted various other tests for evaluating the admissibility of scientific evidence.
The Federal Rules of Evidence allow judges to obtain guidance on the admissibility of scientific evidence from independent scientific experts so that they need not rely solely on experts presented by the adversarial parties.
The appeals court refused to subject the accountant to Daubert, "as that case specifically dealt with the admissibility of scientific evidence.
76) In many jurisdictions, this "general acceptance" test became the primary means of evaluating the admissibility of scientific evidence, especially novel scientific evidence in criminal cases.