Admissible Evidence

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Admissible Evidence

Any item, exhibit, object, material, or recording which a local, district, or federal court will accept as linking an alleged actor to an act.
Examples A knife belonging to the accused, covered with the victim's blood; the uttering of the killer’s name by a dying victim is admissible in some jurisdictions (Michigan, California, Washington, D.C., and the state of Washington).
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THE LEGAL RULES GOVERNING ADMISSIBILITY OF SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE
Law, Cherry-Picking Memories: Why Neuroimaging-Based Lie Detection Requires a New Framework for the Admissibility of Scientific Evidence under FRE 702 and Daubert, 14 YALE J.L.
The Daubert decision initially suggested that a more lenient standard for establishing the admissibility of scientific evidence would be employed.
The admissibility of scientific evidence has been affected by a Supreme Court decision made in Daubert v.
Editorial includes information on such topics as: rules of evidence and admissibility of scientific evidence in law and litigation, comparative tort law (e.g.
Mark McCormick's frequently cited (122) revised approach to determining the admissibility of scientific evidence identifies eleven factors the court might use as criteria relevant to admissibility.
The North Carolina Supreme Court has expressly rejected the federal standard for admissibility of scientific evidence established by the U.S.
In 1993, in the Daubert case, the Supreme Court outlined the current test for the admissibility of scientific evidence in the federal courts.
Under the law of evidence, trial courts must evaluate the admissibility of scientific evidence. (19) Although the required threshold showing differs among jurisdictions at least formally, (20) the underlying concern of courts in all jurisdictions in evaluating the admissibility of evidence is trustworthiness, also called "evidentiary reliability." (21) There are two predominant tests used to determining the reliability of scientific evidence: the Daubert (22) test and the Frye (23) test.
Merrill Dow Pharmaceuticals involved the admissibility of scientific evidence as presented by expert witnesses.
225 (1998); Note, Admissibility of Scientific Evidence, 107 HARV.