Adlerian theory

Adlerian theory

A school of psychological thought which maintains that much of our behaviour is a response to subconscious efforts to compensate for inferiority. (Alfred Adler, German psychiatrist, 1870–1937).
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The authors also offered suggestions for expanding Adlerian theory through the integration of neuroscience-informed developmental theory, conceptualization of functionality, and interventions.
For example, Watts (2003) demonstrated that Adlerian theory represents "an integrative bridge between cognitive constructivist and social constructionist approaches to therapy" (p.
Thus, according to Adlerian theory, individuals with underdeveloped social interest attempt to avoid the tasks of life that require social interest by engaging in substance use (Dreikurs, 1990).
Journal of Adlerian Theory Research, & Practice, 46(4), 516-521.
Her research interests include the use of Child Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) with children and parents, the use of play therapy and filial therapy with children who have experienced trauma, the inclusion of religious and spiritual beliefs in the counseling process and counseling programs, qualitative methodology, application of Adlerian theory and methods in supervision, and mentorship of women in graduate counseling programs.
Individual Psychology: The Journal of Adlerian Theory, Research, and Practice, 53, 342-347.
Ramos sought to analyze the condition of the Mexican character, and gravitated toward the Adlerian theory of the inferiority complex and shied away from sexual etiologies.
Consistent with Adlerian theory (Sweeney, 2009), this self is indivisible, and all its parts are interactive and have a reciprocal influence.
The first category includes the theories, such as, Murray's needs theory (1962), Maslow's theory of motivation (1970, 1996), Adlerian theory of personality (1968) and Bandura's social cognitive theory (1986, 2001, 2002).
Meanwhile, numerous other models have been used with religious and spiritual clients, such as Adlerian theory (Polanski, 2002), person-centered therapy (Baker, 2004), and rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT; Robb, 2001).
Adlerian Theory has received the most attention, followed by Behavioral Theory, Play Therapy, and Systems Theory, in that order.
At the UO, he trained counselors in Adlerian theory, Dreikursian principles of human interaction and family mediation.