Adlerian theory

Adlerian theory

A school of psychological thought which maintains that much of our behaviour is a response to subconscious efforts to compensate for inferiority. (Alfred Adler, German psychiatrist, 1870–1937).
References in periodicals archive ?
Journal of Adlerian Theory, Research and Practice 1983; 39(4):369-379.
Adlerian theory holds that people are creative and unique, strive for belonging, and are goal directed (Adler, 1927/1954).
Journal of Adlerian Theory Research, & Practice, 46(4), 516-521.
Her research interests include the use of Child Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) with children and parents, the use of play therapy and filial therapy with children who have experienced trauma, the inclusion of religious and spiritual beliefs in the counseling process and counseling programs, qualitative methodology, application of Adlerian theory and methods in supervision, and mentorship of women in graduate counseling programs.
Individual Psychology: The Journal of Adlerian Theory, Research, and Practice, 53, 342-347.
Discuss common ground between Adlerian theory and various constructivist approaches to counseling and mention the lack of recognition of Adler in the constructivist literature, in general (cite sources).
"Social Influences in Child Rearing." Individual Psychology: The Journal of Adlerian Theory, Research & Practice 42.3 (1986): 317.
Ramos sought to analyze the condition of the Mexican character, and gravitated toward the Adlerian theory of the inferiority complex and shied away from sexual etiologies.
The IS-Wel is based on Adler's Individual Psychology (Myers & Sweeney, 2008) and emerged following a decade of research using an earlier theoretical model, the Wheel of Wellness (Myers, Sweeney, & Witmer, 2000), also grounded in Adlerian theory. Adler (1927/1954) held a strong belief in the unity and indivisibility of the self, suggesting that individuals cannot be understood as their separate components (such as the id, ego, and superego in Freudian psychoanalysis), but as holistic, idiographic individuals.
Consistent with Adlerian theory (Sweeney, 2009), this self is indivisible, and all its parts are interactive and have a reciprocal influence.
The first category includes the theories, such as, Murray's needs theory (1962), Maslow's theory of motivation (1970, 1996), Adlerian theory of personality (1968) and Bandura's social cognitive theory (1986, 2001, 2002).