adjuvant

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adjuvant

 [aj´ah-vant, ă-joo´vant]
1. assisting or aiding.
2. a substance that aids another, such as an auxiliary remedy.

ad·ju·vant

(ad'jū-vănt),
1. A substance added to a drug product formulation that affects the action of the active ingredient in a predictable way.
2. immunology a vehicle used to enhance antigenicity; for example, a suspension of minerals (alum, aluminum hydroxide, or phosphate) on which antigen is adsorbed; or water-in-oil emulsion in which antigen solution is emulsified in mineral oil (Freund incomplete adjuvant), sometimes with the inclusion of killed mycobacteria (Freund complete adjuvant) to enhance antigenicity further (inhibits degradation of antigen and/or causes influx of macrophages).
3. Additional therapy given to enhance or extend primary therapy's effect, as in chemotherapy's addition to a surgical regimen.
4. A treatment added to a curative treatment to prevent recurrence of clinical cancer from microscopic residual disease.
[L. ad-juvo, pres. p. -juvans, to give aid to]

adjuvant

(ăj′ə-vənt)
n.
1. A treatment that enhances an existing medical regimen, as a pharmacological agent added to a drug to increase or aid its effect.
2. An immunological agent that increases the antigenic response.
adj.
Contributing to or enhancing an existing medical regimen: adjuvant chemotherapy

Adjuvant

Referring to a management strategy used in addition to the primary therapy.
Immunology A substance that enhances or diversifies the immune response; a nonspecific immune enhancer—e.g., Freund’s adjuvant, BCG vaccine—consisting of particulate-rich oily substances which promotes protein aggregation; adjuvant mixed with an antigen acts as a tissue depot, slowly releasing antigen and activating the immune system.
Pharmacology A drug that modulates the actions of other drugs which, when added to a medication, enhances its pharmacologic effect. See Interference.

adjuvant

Immunology Any nonspecific immune enhancer–eg Freund's adjuvant, BCG vaccine, consisting of a particulate-rich oily substances, which promotes protein aggregation; adjuvant mixed with an antigen acts as a tissue depot, slowly releasing antigen and activating the immune system Oncology The addition of chemotherapy to a traditional therapeutic modality to ↓ M&M Pharmacology A substance which, when added to a medication, enhances its pharmacologic effect. See Neoadjutant.

ad·ju·vant

(ad'jū-vănt)
1. A substance added to a drug product formulation that affects the action of the active ingredient in a predictable way.
2. immunology A vehicle used to enhance antigenicity.
3. Additional therapy given to enhance or extend primary therapy's effect, such as in chemotherapy in addition to a surgical regimen.
4. A treatment added to a curative treatment to prevent recurrence of clinical cancer from microscopic residual disease.
[L. ad-juvo, pres. p. -juvans, to give aid to]

adjuvant

1. Any substance added to a drug to increase its effect.
2. Any substance which, added to an ANTIGEN, non-specifically increases its power to stimulate the production of antibodies (see ANTIBODY).

adjuvant

a substance added to enhance a physical or chemical property, e.g. adjuvants are commonly added to ANTIGENS, improving the IMMUNE RESPONSE in the recipient and thus increasing the production of ANTIBODIES.

ad·ju·vant

(ad'jū-vănt)
1. Substance added to a drug product formulation that affects action of the active ingredient in a predictable way.
2. Additional therapy given to enhance or extend primary therapy's effect, as in chemotherapy's addition to a surgical regimen.
[L. ad-juvo, pres. p. -juvans, to give aid to]
References in periodicals archive ?
Goats administered with different doses (5-500 ug) of tick cement antigen emulsified with Montanide adjuvant showed effective immune response through reduction in tick engorgement (decreased weight) and increased percentage tick rejection which proved that Montanide adjuvant is the most potent adjuvant.
In conclusion, we demonstrated the effectiveness of adjuvants in enhancing the antibody production in silver catfish vaccinated with a model antigen.
North America is the biggest geographical market for vaccine adjuvants primarily due to the rise of the elderly population and a surge in government funding across the countries of the region.
To investigate common immunological effects of four adjuvants, we used the Agilent Chicken Gene Expression Microarray dataset from two previous studies on vaccination effects that were obtained from GEO.
Ammonium fertilizers can function as utility adjuvants because they help prevent the formation of precipitates in the tank mix or on the leaf surface.
The analysis of the data showed that carfentrazone-ethyl + clodinafop-propargyl + metsulfuron-methyl alone and with ammonium sulphate as an adjuvant showed significant effect on weeds (Table 1).
In the present study, the influence of mineral adjuvants applied in a mixture with methylated seed oils and petroleum oil on physical properties of spray (pH, surface tension, contact angle and spray deposit area) and on weed control efficacy of foramsulfuron and iodosulfuron-methyl-sodium mixture was determined.
Adjuvants market is segmented based on Additives such as Activator Adjuvants (Surfactants, Oil Adjuvants), Utility Adjuvants (Compatibility Agents, Buffers/Acidifiers, Antifoam Agents, Water Conditioners, Drift Control Agents) and Others.
The two novel adjuvants being tested have shown promise in animal models at enhancing the immune response to influenza vaccines.
Fact.MR forecasts the US surfactant cleansers and adjuvants market to grow from US$ 2,906.8 Mn in 2017 to US$ 3,645.6 Mn in 2026.
The aim of this study is to obtain a high titer anti-KDN polyclonal antibody response using safer and more efficient adjuvant systems that are alternative to Freund's adjuvants without using any carrier protein against the hapten-structured KDN molecule.
Physical Characteristics and Stability Study of Adjuvants. Freshly prepared emulsions were analyzed using dynamic light scattering (DLS) with a Malvern Zetasizer Nano ZS 90 (Malvern Instruments, Westborough, MA, USA) to determine droplet size, polydispersity, and zeta potential.