adjunct

(redirected from Adjuncts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

adjunct

 [ad´junkt]
an accessory or auxiliary agent or measure.

adjunct

[ad′jungkt]
Etymology: L, adjungere, to join
(in health care) an additional substance, treatment, or procedure used for increasing the efficacy or safety of the primary substance, treatment, or procedure or for facilitating its performance. adjunctive, adj.

adjunct

A thing joined or added to another thing, which is not an essential part thereof—e.g., radiation therapy is an important adjunct to surgery and may represent appropriate adjuvant therapy.

adjunct

Medtalk A thing joined or added to another thing but which is not an essential part thereof–eg, RT is an important adjunct to surgery and may represent appropriate adjuvant therapy

adjunct (aj´ungkt),

n a drug or other substance that serves a supplemental purpose in therapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The past two years have seen a substantial increase in collective bargaining between adjuncts and institutions that employ them.
Adjuncts dispute the order of those actions and say they withdrew their petition because of the colleges move to seek a religious exemption.
The Department of Accounting has an ongoing need for highly qualified adjunct faculty to staff a variety of courses each semester at the undergraduate and graduate levels.
For the most part, contingent or adjunct faculty inspire the most sympathy.
Professionals who consistently employ interns and recent graduates from nearby colleges and universities are greatly appreciated and are often viewed favorably as potential adjuncts.
In recent months, adjuncts at several colleges across the country have lobbied to join unions; some even held a "hunger strike" to draw attention to their low pay.
Advancement opportunities and job security for adjuncts with outstanding evaluations and participation in professional development can be another type of award that addresses concerns of adjuncts.
Single-income adjuncts tend to be a scattered lot, ones difficult to organize because they are at multiple worksites with multiple obligations and scant time for much else.
Regardless of the long delay, the adjunct faculty continues in its overwhelming support for union representation.
Boylan and Saxon (1998) reported that at colleges where 70% or more of developmental courses were taught by adjuncts, significant numbers of these courses yielded unacceptably low pass rates on a state-mandated exit exam.
Feldman and Turnley (2001) found that many adjuncts seek part-time teaching positions because of flexible scheduling and a desire to work with seasoned faculty.
Lornell says conditions have improved since GWU adjuncts formed a union in 2006 and won a contract two years later.