Adjudin


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Adjudin

A non-toxic analogue of lonidamine which, in rats, causes reversible infertility, disrupting the junctions between nurse (Sertoli) cells in the testes, prematurely releasing sperm that don’t become functional gametes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cheng, "Adjudin, a potential male contraceptive, exerts its effects locally in the seminiferous epithelium of mammalian testes," Reproduction, vol.
Jenardhanan et al., "Adjudin disrupts spermatogenesis by targeting drug transporters," Spermatogenesis, vol.
"Inhibition of sperm capacitation and fertilizing capacity by adjudin is mediated by chloride and its channels in humans," Human Reproduction 28(1): 47-59.
"Adjudin disrupts spermatogenesis via the action of some unlikely partners: Eps8, Arp2/3 complex, drebrin E, PAR6 and 14-3-3," Spermatogenesis 1(4): 291.
"Testin and actin are key molecular targets of adjudin, an anti-spermatogenic agent, in the testis," Spermatogenesis 1(2): 137-146.
"An in vivo study on adjudin and blood-testis barrier dynamics," Endocrinology 150(10): 4724-4733.
"Adjudin targeting rabbit germ cell adhesion as a male contraceptive: A pharmacokinetics study," Journal of Andrology 30(1): 87-93.
Cheng was first put on the trail of Adjudin more than 15 years ago through the work of Professor Bruno Silvestrini, a colleague at the University of Rome, who was studying an anticancer drug, lonidamine.
Adjudin interferes with the adhesion of germ cells to the supportive Sertoli cells that surround them.
When Adjudin was administered orally at a high dose, however, it caused liver inflammation and muscle atrophy in a small subset of animals.
"The Serteli-spermatid junctional complex adhesion strength is affected in vitro by Adjudin," Journal of Andrology 27(6): 790-794.