adenomatous polyposis coli


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to adenomatous polyposis coli: Familial adenomatous polyposis

familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP),

[MIM*175100]
polyposis that usually begins in childhood; polyps increase in number, causing symptoms of chronic colitis; pigmented retinal lesions are frequently found; carcinoma of the colon almost invariably develops in untreated cases; autosomal dominant inheritance, caused by mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC) on 5q. In Gardner syndrome, which is allelic to FAP, there are extracolonic changes (desmoid tumors, osteomas, jaw cysts).

APC

Abbreviation for:
activated protein C (see there)
adenomatous polyposis coli (see there)
aerobic plate count  (microbiology)
air pollution control
allophycocyanin
ammonium perchlorate
amyloid pack core 
antigen-presenting cell (see there)
antiphlogistic-corticoid (obsolete)
aperature current
apneustic centre  (neuroanatomy)
arterial premature contraction
aspirin, phenacetin, caffeine
Association of Pathology Chairmen
Association of Professors of Cardiology
atrial premature contraction (see there)
Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib (clinical trials)
ambulatory payment classification (see there) (Managed care)
APC gene (molecular medicine)
APC protein (molecular medicine)

Genetics
A gene on chromosome 5q21-q22 that encodes a tumour-suppressor protein which acts as an antagonist of the Wnt signalling pathway. APC is also involved in cell migration and adhesion, transcriptional activation, and apoptosis.

Molecular Pathology
APC mutations cause familial adenomatous polyposis.

adenomatous polyposis coli

Familial adenomatous polyposis, see there. See APC gene, APC protein.

fa·mi·li·al ad·e·nom·a·tous pol·y·po·sis

(FAP) (fă-mil'ē-ăl ad'ĕ-nō'mă-tŭs pol'i-pō'sis)
Polyposis of the colon that usually begins in childhood; polyps increase in number, causing symptoms of chronic colitis; pigmented retinal lesions are frequently found; carcinoma of the colon almost invariably develops in untreated cases; autosomal dominant inheritance, caused by mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC) on 5q. In Gardner syndrome, which is allelic to FAP, there are extracolonic changes (desmoid tumors, osteomas, jaw cysts).
Synonym(s): adenomatous polyposis coli, familial polyposis coli.
References in periodicals archive ?
For many years there has been an absence of genetically engineered mouse models of invasive intestinal cancer to analyse the complex processes occurring during the invasion-metastasis-cascade and the presumably underlying mechanisms such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), cancer stem cell populations and mutation rates in the intestine.Combining adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc)-loss with either p53 mutation or Tgf-E- receptor (Tgfbr)-loss results in invasive intestinal carcinoma of mice.
Molecular analyses of those cells showed that genetic alterations of the earliest tumor suppressor genes, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), were only identified in the luminal surface dysplastic cells (top of the crypts) and not in the bases of the same crypts.
MUTYH biallelic germline mutations have been found in 4%-33% (2, 3) of patients with multiple colorectal adenomas and in 7.5%-29% of patients who have attenuated or classic adenomatous polyposis coli and no detectable APC germline mutations (2,4-6).
Adenomatous polyposis coli mutations were found in the purified fecal DNA of 26 of 46 patients with colorectal cancer.
Wu et al., "Detection of sequence variations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography," Genetic Testing, vol.
Molecular diagnosis of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP): genotyping of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) alleles by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.
This autosomal-dominant disorder results from a mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene and accounts for 1% of all colorectal cancer.
The suppressor gene pathway was characterized from studies of hereditary CRC that developed in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis coli (Figure 1).