Adenomatoid Tumour

Adenomatoid Tumour

An uncommon benign mesothelial tumour of the genital tract, which is the commonest paratesticular tumour. It occurs in the ovary, testis and epididymis, as well as the adrenal, mesentery, pancreas, uterus and fallopian tube.
DiffDx Vascular tumours, lymphangiomas, leiomyoma (fibroid).
DiffDx, paratesticular mesothelial tumours Mesothelial hyperplasia, mesothelioma, well differentiated papillary mesothelioma.
Management Excision if symptomatic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Birn, "The adenomatoid odontogenic tumour, ameloblastic adenomatoid tumour or adenoameloblastoma," APMIS-Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica, vol.
Benign lesions that were histopathologically diagnosed included mature teratoma, adenomatoid tumour, granulomatous orchitis, chronic orchitis, epididim-orchitis, epididymal cyst, Leydig cell tumour, Sertoli cell tumour, fibrous pseudotumour, tunica albugenia cyst, epidermal cyst, leiomyoma, fibroma, juvenile granulosa cell tumour, granulomatous epididymitis, and microlithiasis with epididymal abscess.
Nephrogenic adenoma has also been referred to as mesonephric adenoma/metaplasia, adenomatoid tumour, and adenomatoid metaplasia [7].
Immunohistochemical evidence for mesothelial origin of paratesticular adenomatoid tumour. Histopathology.
Birn, "The adenomatoid odontogenic tumour, ameloblastic adenomatoid tumour or adenoameloblastoma," Acta Pathologica et Microbiologica Scandinavica, vol.
Both benign and malignant tumours of the epididymis, spermatic cord, and paratesticular tissues are relatively rare and are primarily seen in older patients.[3] Benign paratesticular tumours include adenomatoid tumour, papillary cystadenoma, fibroma, lymphangioma, adrenal rest tumours and dermoid cysts.
They mention that D2-40 is a more specific marker for lymphatic lineage but D2-40 has been shown to be expressed by epithelioid-type mesothelial neoplasms so lack of cytokeratin staining should be demonstrated.2 Cystic lymphangioma-like adenomatoid tumour of the adrenal gland may be included to the histopathologic differential diagnosis.
As a result, the lesion is known by many names, including adenoameloblastoma, adenoameloblastic odontoma, epithelial tumour associated with developmental cysts, ameloblastic adenomatoid tumour and adenomatoid or pseudoadenomatous ameloblastoma.
INTRODUCTION: Adenomatoid tumour of epididymis (ATE) was first described by Golden et al as a small mass in scrotal region without any clinical symptoms.
Immunohistochemical staining was strongly positive for endothelial markers (CD31 and CD 34), and negative for mesothelial (Calretinin, WT1) and lymphatic markers (D2-40), excluding an adenomatoid tumour. On the basis of these characteristic morphological and immunohistochemical findings, the diagnosis of testicular capillary hemangioma made.
The most common tumours that arise from the paratesticular tissue are benign neoplasms, such as leiomyoma, lipoma and adenomatoid tumour.[sup.1] Although schwannoma is the most common tumour of the peripheral nerves, it is extremely rare in the paratesticular region.
(8,9) These lesions comprise about 6% of paratesticular masses, second to adenomatoid tumours. (1,10) Still, their relatively rare occurrence has meant that most available information comes from case reports and series.