Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour

Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour

An uncommon and usually asymptomatic, non-invasive hamartomatous lesion with slow progressive growth which accounts for 2–13% of all odontogenic tumours. AOT usually affects young patients, under age 30, has a male:female ratio 1:2, and occurs in the anterior maxillary region. It is thought to arise from the odontogenic epithelium of the dental laminar complex or its remnants. It is often associated with impacted canines.
Imaging Cystic radiologic appearance.
Management Curettage teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The complications associated with the impacted teeth are resorbtion of adjacent roots which can make the teeth prone to caries and premature tooth loss, soft and hard tissue pathologies like Odontogenic cysts which include Dentigerous cysts , Odontogenic Keratocysts ,Calcifying Odontogeic cyst ,and the most common tumours are the Ameloblastoma , Calcifying epithelial Odontogenic tumour and Adenomatoid Odontogenic tumour.10,11
Xu, "Characteristic features of the adenomatoid odontogenic tumour on cone beam CT," Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, vol.
The findings on imaging can be explained as mixed radiolucent radiopaque lesion, so diagnosis are Central Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumour (CEOT), Calcifying odontogenic cyst, Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour, Complex odontoma, Ameloblastic fibro-odontoma, Fibro-osseous lesions and osteoblastoma should be considered.
Differential diagnosis of ameloblastic fibroodontoma includes odontoma, ameloblastoma, ameloblastic fibroma, odontoameloblastoma, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour, calcifying epithelial odontogenic cyst, and adenomatoid odontogenic tumour. These clinical conditions can be clearly differentiated from ameloblastic fibroodontoma based on radiographs due to the presence of dental hard tissue (enamel and dentin), clinical findings, and prognosis that also supplemented our case diagnosis [16].
A rare case of extrafollicular adenomatoid odontogenic tumour in the posterior region of the mandible: misdiagnosed as residual cyst.
Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour was first described by Dreibladt, in 1907, as a pseudoadenoameloblastoma.
Angiomyxomatous polyp--1 (3.12%), salivary fibrous tumours -2 (6.25%), pleomorphic adenoma--1 (3.12%), adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (3.12%) were rare.
A systematic search of the English language medical literature revealed only seven such cases in children and adolescents in the age range of 8-18 years (PubMed search using the key words adenomatoid odontogenic tumour, dentigerous cyst).
4 Batra P, Prasad S, Prakash H, Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour: Review and case report, J Can Dent Assoc 2005; 71(4): 250-53.
There are 3 variants of adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (6-8) the follicular type (accounting for 73% of cases), which has a central lesion associated with an embedded tooth; the extrafollicular type (24% of case), which has a central lesion and no connection with the tooth; and the peripheral variety (3% of cases).
They include 20 cases of Ameloblastoma, 5 calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour, 10 adenomatoid odontogenic tumours, 10 ameloblastic fibromas and 10 cases of odontogenic myxomas.