Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour

Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour

An uncommon and usually asymptomatic, non-invasive hamartomatous lesion with slow progressive growth which accounts for 2–13% of all odontogenic tumours. AOT usually affects young patients, under age 30, has a male:female ratio 1:2, and occurs in the anterior maxillary region. It is thought to arise from the odontogenic epithelium of the dental laminar complex or its remnants. It is often associated with impacted canines.
Imaging Cystic radiologic appearance.
Management Curettage teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The findings on imaging can be explained as mixed radiolucent radiopaque lesion, so diagnosis are Central Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumour (CEOT), Calcifying odontogenic cyst, Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour, Complex odontoma, Ameloblastic fibro-odontoma, Fibro-osseous lesions and osteoblastoma should be considered.
A rare case of extrafollicular adenomatoid odontogenic tumour in the posterior region of the mandible: misdiagnosed as residual cyst.
Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour in mandible in a 14-year-old boy.
Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour was first described by Dreibladt, in 1907, as a pseudoadenoameloblastoma.
The term adenomatoid odontogenic tumour [AOT] was adopted in the initial edition of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Histological Typing of Odontogenic Tumors, Jaw Cysts and Allied Lesions in 1971 and was retained in the second edition in 1992.
There are 3 variants of adenomatoid odontogenic tumour, the follicular type (accounting for 73% of cases), which has a central lesion associated with an embedded tooth; the extrafollicular type (24% of case), which has a central lesion and no connection with the tooth; and the peripheral variety (3% of cases).
Recent studies indicate that the cells of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumour usually differentiate toward an apparent ameloblastic phenotype but fail to achieve further functional maturation.
There are 3 variants of adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (6-8) the follicular type (accounting for 73% of cases), which has a central lesion associated with an embedded tooth; the extrafollicular type (24% of case), which has a central lesion and no connection with the tooth; and the peripheral variety (3% of cases).
This report describes a follicular adenomatoid odontogenic tumour in the mandible, illustrates the clinical, microscopic and biological features of the tumour and emphasizes the importance of the relation between the dental follicle and the tumour tissue.
On the basis of the clinical and radiographic findings, the differential diagnosis was adenomatoid odontogenic tumour, ameloblastic fibrous odontoma, calcifying odontogenic cyst, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour, infected dentigerous cyst, and unicystic ameloblastoma.
The histopathological report confirmed the diagnosis of adenomatoid odontogenic tumour.
They include 20 cases of Ameloblastoma, 5 calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour, 10 adenomatoid odontogenic tumours, 10 ameloblastic fibromas and 10 cases of odontogenic myxomas.