Adaptive Landscape

Adaptive Landscape

A surface plotted in a 3-dimensional graph; with all possible combinations of allele frequencies for different loci plotted in the plane, and mean fitness for each combination plotted in a third dimension.
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Investigating cancer and its proliferation through genetic changes and ignoring the adaptive landscape is most likely futile.
Because of the complexity of majority-minority relations in all of their permutations, and because of the difficulty or even impossibility of designing successful ethnic strategies in the constantly changing adaptive landscape, Salter is appropriately humble about his analysis; the case presented is "anything but complete".
An adaptive landscape method was used to study a combination of the relative number of tines and relative tine length.
I combined the relative number of fines and relative tine length through use of an adaptive landscape, also called a fitness surface (Ridley 1993, Futuyma 1998).
In the adaptive landscape, there was an overall increase in tine length and a decrease in number of tines except for the first plot (the beginning of the 1950s).
In an adaptive landscape, the relative tine length increased, and the relative number of tines decreased.
In their model, Perelson and Macken assume protein evolution occurs as a direct uphill walk on an adaptive landscape -- or, in a biological interpretation, as a series of adaptive point mutations in the DNA codes that translate into a series of progressively fitter proteins.
In 1970, British evolution scientist John Maynard Smith extended the idea of adaptive landscapes to what he called "protein space" -- a multidimensional mathematical construct whose points correspond to each of the protein sequences of designated lengths that can be built using the 20 amino acids that serve as the proteins' molecular building blocks.
Other researchers have further developed the notions of adaptive landscapes and protein space, and some are even beginning to apply them to a special, accelerated example of protein evolution -- namely, the fine-tuning of antibodies during an immune response.
This idea has remained well-entrenched, even with recent recognition that hominin origins took place in a woodland environment and that the adaptive landscape in Africa fluctuated dramatically in response to short-term climatic shifts.
This project will identify the molecular pathways subjected collectively to natural selection and provide a completely novel view on adaptive landscapes.

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