acute myocardial infarction


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acute myocardial infarction

Cardiology The abrupt death of heart muscle due to acute occlusion or spasm of the coronary arteries Epidemiology ±1.5 million MIs/yr–US, 75,000 AMI follow strenuous physical activity, of whom13 die; ±14 of all deaths in the US are due to AMIs; > 60% of the AMI-related deaths occur within 1 hr of the event; most are due to arrhythmias, in particular ventricular fibrillation Triggers Heavy exertion in ±5% of Pts, which is inversely related to Pt's habitual physical activity Etiology Occlusion of major coronary artery–CA, in a background of ASHD, due primarily to the plugging of the vessel with debris from an unstable plaque–see Uncomplicated plaque Clinical Main presenting symptom–retrosternal chest pain accompanied by tightness, discomfort, & SOB; cardiac pain often radiates to the arm & neck, and less commonly to the jaw; the pain of AMI generally is. not relieved with nitroglycerin, in contrast to esophageal pain, which is often identical in presentation, and may respond, albeit slowly, to nitroglycerin; the characteristic clinical picture notwithstanding, there is a high rate of false negative diagnoses of AMIs Diagnosis Clinical presentation, physical examination, EKG–sensitivity in diagnosing AMI is 50–70%, and is lower in lateral MIs than in anterior and inferior MIs; CXR may demonstrate left ventricular failure, cardiomegaly Echocardiography M-mode, 2-D & Doppler Radioisotopic studies Radionuclide angiography, perfusion scintigraphy, infarct-avid scintigraphy, & PET can be used to detect an AMI, determine size & effects on ventricular function, and establish prognosis; a radiopharmaceutical, 99mTc-sestamibi, has become the perfusion imaging agent of choice, given its usefulness for measuring the area of the myocardium at risk for AMI, and for recognizing the myocardium salvaged after thrombolytic therapy Other imaging techniques–eg, CT, and MRI Lab CK-MB, troponin I DiffDx AMI is the most common cause of acute chest pain in older adults, other conditions must be excluded–Prevention ↓ Smoking, ↓ cholesterol, ↓ HTN; ↑ aerobic exercise; influence of other factors-eg maintaining normal body weight, euglycemic state in diabetes, estrogen-replacement therapy, mild-to-moderate alcohol consumption, effect of prophylactic low-dose aspirin-on incidence of AMI is less clear. See AIMS, ASSET, EMERAS, EMIP, GISSI, GISSI-2, GUSTO-1, INJECT, ISIS-2, ISIS-3, LATE, MITI-1, MITI-2, RAPID, TAMI-5, TAMI-7, TEAM-2, TIMI-2, TIMI-4, Trial.
Differential diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction
Arm pain
Myocardial ischemia, cervical/thoracic vertebral pain, thoracic outlet syndrome
Epigastric pain
Myocardial ischemia, GI tract–esophagus, peptic ulcers, pancreas, liver disease–cholecystitis, hepatic distension, pericardial pain, pneumonia
Retrosternal pain
Myocardial ischemia, aortic dissection, esophageal pain, mediastinal lesions, pericardial pain, PTE
Shoulder pain
Myocardial ischemia, cervical vertebra, acute musculoskeletal lesions, pericardial pain, pleuritis, subdiaphragmatic abscess, thoracic outlet syndrome
.

a·cute cor·o·nar·y syn·drome

(ACS) (ă-kyūt' kōr'ŏ-nar-ē sin'drōm)
A general term for clinical syndromes due to reduction of blood flow in coronary arteries (e.g., unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction).
Synonym(s): acute myocardial infarction, preinfarction angina, unstable angina.

a·cute cor·o·nar·y syn·drome

(ACS) (ă-kyūt' kōr'ŏ-nar-ē sin'drōm)
A general term for clinical syndromes due to reduction of blood flow in coronary arteries.
Synonym(s): preinfarction angina, unstable angina.
References in periodicals archive ?
Streptokinase - a review of its pharmacology and therapeutic efficacy in acute myocardial infarction in older patients.
The prognostic importance of worsening renal function during an acute myocardial infarction on long-term mortality.
Trends of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in Eastern rural China from 2001 to 2011 – China PEACE Retrospective Acute Myocardial Infarction Study (in Chinese).
Cardiovascular mortality and heart failure risk score for patients after ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (Data from the Leiden MISSION!
Citation: Vinay Sanghi et al., "Autologous bone marrow concentrate enriched in progenitor cells--An adjuvant in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction," International Journal of the Cardiovascular Academy, online 18 April 2016, DOI: 10.1016/j.ijcac.2016.04.001
Task Force on the management of ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) ESC Guidelines for the management of acute myocardial infarction in patients presenting with ST-segment elevation.
The connection between acute myocardial infarction and influenza was first observed in the 1930s during the flu season.
Apical ballooning syndrome: A mimic of acute myocardial infarction. Am Heart J 2008; 155:408417.
One hundred fifteen Japanese patients (mean age, 70 years) with an acute myocardial infarction who were undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomly assigned to receive 1800 mg per day of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or no EPA, starting within 24 hours after the PCI.
Myocardial rupture is a relatively common finding in patients dying of an acute myocardial infarction; its incidence ranges from 0.93 to 2.7% according to different statistics (Yip et al 2003), but appears to have decreased in patients undergoing primary percutaneous intervention for AMI.

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