Active Stretching


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Active Stretching

Popular health The stretching of agonist muscles while opposed by the antagonists. 
Physical therapy Stretching of an extremity in which a position is assumed and then held with no assistance other than the strength of the agonist muscles—e.g., raising the leg, then holding it, using only the leg muscles to maintain extension. The tension of the agonists in active stretching helps to relax the muscles being stretched (the antagonists) by reciprocal inhibition. Active stretching increases flexibility and strengthens agonistic muscles. Active stretching positions may be difficult to hold and maintain for more than 10 seconds and rarely need to be held any longer than 15 seconds. Many of the movements/stretches in yoga are active stretches.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
For anyone experiencing Thai massage for the first time be prepared for an active stretching and rolling, and even cracking; booking body massage in Thailand is not only easy but almost impossible to not to, as the massage centers are widely spread.
4] Active stretching exercises are commonly performed in sports and the mechanisms that suggested such changes are not well-known.
recommended the use of heat procedures, high voltage galvanic and transcutaneous neuromuscular stimulation, as best methods for preparing tissues for passive or active stretching [21].
Dynamic or active stretching means moving while you stretch and it delivers better results.
The participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: active stretching (6), passive stretching (6), or control (6).
Active stretching improves flexibility, joint torque, and functional mobility in older women.
I do brisk walking, then normal paced walking, then slower walking, then massage and active stretching.
The static active stretching is not recommended before strength exercise because it induces a poor performance.
3] MOVE ON TO ACTIVE STRETCHING, like sun salutations and lunges.
Group A Participants completed an active stretching exercise program for 4 weeks (6 days per week, 2 times per day) at home.
The warm-up will consist of active stretching and a variety of low-impact cardio boosting exercises like jumping jacks, squats and high-knees.
Depending on assessment, techniques may have encompassed Swedish, soft tissue release including trigger point, and passive and active stretching.