acrylic resin

(redirected from Acrylic Resins)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Acrylic Resins: Polyester resins

a·cryl·ic res·in

a general term applied to a resinous material of the various esters of acrylic acid; used as a denture base material, for other dental restorations, and for trays.

resin

(rez'in) [L. resina, fr. Gr. rhetine, resin of the pine]
1. A natural, amorphous, nonvolatile, soft or solid exudation of plants. It is practically insoluble in water but dissolves in alcohol. See: rosin
2. Any of a class of solid or soft organic compounds of natural or synthetic origin. They are usually of high molecular weight and most are polymers. Included are polyvinyl, polyethylene, and polystyrene. These are combined with chemicals such as epoxides, plasticizers, pigments, fillers, and stabilizers to form plastics.

acrylic resin

Quick-cure resin.

anion-exchange resin

See: ion-exchange resin

cation-exchange resin

See: ion-exchange resin

cholestyramine resin

An ion-exchange resin used to treat itching associated with jaundice and elevated serum lipid levels. Side effects may include bloating and abdominal discomfort.

cold-cure resin

Quick-cure resin.

ion-exchange resin

An ionizable synthetic substance, which may be acid or basic, used accordingly to remove either acid or basic ions from solutions. Anion-exchange resins are used to absorb acid in the stomach, and cation-exchange resins are used to remove basic (alkaline) ions from solutions.

quick-cure resin

An autopolymer resin, used in many dental procedures, that can be polymerized by an activator and catalyst without applying external heat.
Synonym: acrylic resin; cold-cure resin; self-curing resin

self-curing resin

Quick-cure resin.

a·cryl·ic res·in

(ă-krilik rezin)
Resinous material of various esters of acrylic acid; used as a denture base material, dental restorations, and trays.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2006) reported that there was an increase in the impact strength of heat-polymerized acrylic resin with the addition of rod and woven glass fibers.
The materials compared in this study are representative of three chemical types currently available in the market: (1) Revotek LC (GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan), a UDMA composite resin; (2) Protemp (3M ESPE, Minnesota, USA), a Bis-GMA composite resin; (3) Temporary Cold-V Major (Prodotti Dentari S.p.A., Italy.), a PMMA acrylic resin.
The viscosity of acrylic resins was determined using Brookfield DV-II+ Viscometer at 25[degrees]C according to test method ISO 2555.
Broken acrylic resin dentures may be repaired with auto-polymerizing acrylic resin, heat-curing acrylic resin and recently, with visible light-cured resin.
reported that acrylic resins exert cytotoxic effects on epithelial cells.
(3) To quantitatively find out the differential ability of the four different denture cleansers in removing tea stains from acrylic resins.
Complete dentures are fabricated using acrylic resin that provides dimensional stability, strength, and hardness, resulting in comfortable, esthetically pleasing, and highly functional dentures [2].
Acrylic resins; acrylic-styrene; alkyd resins; amino; crosslinking resins; emulsions; epoxy hardeners; epoxy resins; high-solid resins; hybrid resins; melamine/melamine-type resins; phenolic resins; phenoxy resins; polyamide resins; polyester resins; styrene resins; UV curing resins; urethane crosslinkers; urethane/polyurethane resins; water-thinned resins
Abstract An ambient-temperature self-crosslinkable acrylic resin was synthesized by solution polymerization, with ethanol as solvent; butyl acrylate (BA), methyl methacrylate (MMA), acrylic acid (AA), hydroxypropyl acrylate (HPA), and diacetone acrylamide (DAAM) as monomers; and adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as crosslinker.
Keywords: Heat cure acrylic resins, Vickers micro-hardness, Disinfectants.
Routine usage may cause bleaching of acrylic resin and may have a harmful effect on soft resilient denture liners.
Key words: Maxillofacial prosthetics, facial defects, silicone acrylic resins.