acronym

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acronym

A neologism created from the first letter of the each of the words in a particular phrase.

Acronym

Vox populi A neologism created from the first letter of the each of the words in a particular phrase. See Acroeponym, Trial.

acronym

Vox populi A neologism created from the first letter of the each of the words in a particular phrase. See Acroeponym, Trial.

ac·ro·nym

(ak'rō-nim)
A pronounceable word formed from the initial letters of each word or selected words in a phrase (e.g., AIDS).
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, it's an acronym good and proper, describing exactly what it does in its tanks.
I just remember the simple days of yesteryear when acronym stories carried less social baggage.
This would mean that all representative consonants in acronyms are pronounced with an /-a-/ sound.
In fact many authors have already suggested modification of existing acronyms and many acronyms have already been replaced in the dermatology literature.
Please do not get me started on TLA's, FLA's, and RAS (Redundant Acronym Syndrome).
An acronym for universal serial bus, USB is the most common type of computer port, or connector, used in today's computers.
Among the several existing methods for acronyms and acronyms expansion extraction in the literature, we present here some significant works.
Not that VRM is a bad idea: As the power dynamic in the vendor-customer relationship shifts ever more in favor of the latter, it's only sensible that an acronym comparable to "CRM" would come along to connote the individual's ability to manage interactions with the brands vying for her attention.
I call my campaign GROAN - Get Rid Of Acronyms Now.
of Florida, Jacksonville) presents acronyms and terms alphabetically, with each letter of acronyms defined in one section, followed by definitions of terms.
In our imperfect world, however, staff members across an organization's various business functions are frequently on different pages--often because of the acronyms each uses--particularly in speech.