adaptive immune system

(redirected from Acquired immune response)
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adaptive immune system

n.
The component of the vertebrate immune system involving lymphocytes (B cells and T cells) containing a small number of genetically encoded proteins that combine to produce an enormous variety of proteins capable of recognizing and deactivating specific antigens.
References in periodicals archive ?
Avian immune response is divided in two arms, the innate immune response and the acquired immune response (JEURISSEN et al., 2000; KAISER, 2012).
The avian immune system has been demonstrated to be highly competent, with a robust innate and acquired immune response against different kinds of pathogens.
It is possible that blocking TRPV1 may be either beneficial, as a reduction of oxidative stress may reflect on reduced vascular dysfunction, or deleterious, as impairment of innate response may lead to an inefficient removal of the parasite in addition to an inefficient acquired immune response to malaria.
Activation of the acquired immune response reduces coupled bone formation in response to a periodontal pathogen.
The FreshPack(R) microbial product line is focused in two new areas of crop benefits called growth promotion and acquired immune response. These product categories typically are associated with yield increases and carry less stringent regulatory standards both for the microbial and for the use of the BioJect(R) at remote sites.
White blood cells (leukocytes) are responsible for directing the innate and acquired immune response. The diagram below depicts the relationship of various types of leukocytes.
In contrast, some aspects of T and B cell responses, which form the acquired immune response, are usually overactive in these disorders.
The acquired immune response to an allergen is influenced by the nature of the innate immune system.
Immunologists, microbiologists, and other researchers from around the world cover vaccines, immunology, host cells, and biomarkers, with discussion of the role of cellular processes in host immunity, cell-autonomous effector mechanisms, autophagy, innate and acquired immune responses, animal models, and vaccine development; drugs and the biology of tuberculosis, including cell division processes, mycobacterial cell growth, antibacterial drug development, drug targets, antituberculosis drugs, host-directed therapies, and comparative genomics; and clinical aspects, such as epidemiology, diagnostic assays, imaging, drug regimens, clinical features in adults and children, the management of drug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and tuberculosis and comorbid conditions.
(2001) demonstrated that surfactant interactions with macrophages and dendritic cells help to shift responses from purely innate to acquired immune responses. Surfactant protein A signals amniotic fluid macrophages to migrate to the uterus and initiate the parturition process (Condon et al.
Both innate and acquired immune responses are needed to control infection.
Density-dependent acquired immune responses are elicited by both invading iL3s and established parasitic adults (e.g., [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 5 OMITTED]).

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