adaptive immune system

(redirected from Acquired immune response)
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adaptive immune system

n.
The component of the vertebrate immune system involving lymphocytes (B cells and T cells) containing a small number of genetically encoded proteins that combine to produce an enormous variety of proteins capable of recognizing and deactivating specific antigens.
References in periodicals archive ?
Activation of the acquired immune response reduces coupled bone formation in response to a periodontal pathogen.
It has been suggested that the primary acquired immune response to a given antigen is influenced by the nature of the innate immune system (and its associated cytokine response).
White blood cells (leukocytes) are responsible for directing the innate and acquired immune response.
Two key features of the acquired immune response are specificity and memory.
Stull, Stull & Brody announced that it has filed a class action complaint on behalf of all persons who acquired Immune Response Corp.
Immunologists, microbiologists, and other researchers from around the world cover vaccines, immunology, host cells, and biomarkers, with discussion of the role of cellular processes in host immunity, cell-autonomous effector mechanisms, autophagy, innate and acquired immune responses, animal models, and vaccine development; drugs and the biology of tuberculosis, including cell division processes, mycobacterial cell growth, antibacterial drug development, drug targets, antituberculosis drugs, host-directed therapies, and comparative genomics; and clinical aspects, such as epidemiology, diagnostic assays, imaging, drug regimens, clinical features in adults and children, the management of drug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and tuberculosis and comorbid conditions.
Both innate and acquired immune responses are needed to control infection.

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