Acquired Mutation


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Related to Acquired Mutation: somatic mutation, conditional mutant

Acquired Mutation

Genetics A post-meiotic alteration in a DNA sequence, which can be passed to the mutated cell’s progeny and linked to the development of cancer.
Molecular biology A non-heritable genetic change in a somatic cell; a somatic mutation.
References in periodicals archive ?
88,97) Interestingly, the additionally acquired mutations in patients with MDS-RAEB and those with MDS/AML are mostly class I mutations, including FLT3-ITD, cKit-D816 mutations, and N-Ras mutations.
They took cord blood stem cells with fewer acquired mutations and no epigenetic memory.
We began with stem cells taken from cord-blood, which have fewer acquired mutations and little, if any, epigenetic memory, which cells accumulate as time goes on," Elias Zambidis from Johns Hopkins Institute for Cell Engineering and the Kimmel Cancer Center said.
Several human populations have independently acquired mutations that allow them to use milk as a nutritious food source into adulthood.
The book itself (chapters 45 and 46) describes the probable ways in which acquired mutations can be atherogenic and can be a necessary causal co-actor in most cases of fatal ischemic heart disease.
In the case of hereditary colon cancer, what is passed down the generations is a faulty DNA repair gene, which means that those who inherit this gene are less capable of coping with environmental assaults on their genes or repairing the mistakes that occur during normal cell division, and become more likely to accumulate the series of acquired mutations that lead to the formation of a tumor.
Heteroplasmy arises with certain types of inherited mtDNA mutations as well as in cases of acquired mutations.
Mitochondrial disorders are often caused by inherited or acquired mutations in mitochondrial DNA and can result in symptoms affecting multiple organ systems, including the liver, the brain and nervous system, kidneys, and cardiovascular function.
Ben-Dayan et al propose that normal cells are robust because they can maintain a normal phenotype while buffering the impact of acquired mutations in their genome, however, cancer cells have lost the ability to maintain a normal phenotype in the face of genomic and transcriptional instability; that is, they demonstrate a disintegration of robustness.
The team then used electronic medical records to follow the patients' subsequent medical histories, finding that the subjects with these acquired mutations had a 13-times elevated risk of blood cancer.
The research is the first large-scale analysis of the combined contributions of inherited and acquired mutations in a major cancer type.

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