Acquired Mutation


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Related to Acquired Mutation: somatic mutation, conditional mutant

Acquired Mutation

Genetics A post-meiotic alteration in a DNA sequence, which can be passed to the mutated cell’s progeny and linked to the development of cancer.
Molecular biology A non-heritable genetic change in a somatic cell; a somatic mutation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acquired mutations in GATA1 in the megakaryoblastic leukemia of Down syndrome.
Additionally, populations with acquired mutations may increase over time resulting in long-term clinical consequences.
Acquired mutations in the genes encoding IDH1 and IDH2 both are recurrent aberrations in acute myeloid leukemia: prevalence and prognostic value.
We saw that 9.8% of children with T-cell leukemia (T-ALL) harbor acquired mutations in the ribosome, the cellular protein translation factory.
"You could argue that the colon is exposed to more environmental factors than the small intestine, which increases the potential rate of acquired mutations," says Tomasetti.
(88,97) Interestingly, the additionally acquired mutations in patients with MDS-RAEB and those with MDS/AML are mostly class I mutations, including FLT3-ITD, cKit-D816 mutations, and N-Ras mutations.
They took cord blood stem cells with fewer acquired mutations and no epigenetic memory.
"We began with stem cells taken from cord-blood, which have fewer acquired mutations and little, if any, epigenetic memory, which cells accumulate as time goes on," Elias Zambidis from Johns Hopkins Institute for Cell Engineering and the Kimmel Cancer Center said.
Berends et al., "Acquired mutations in TET2 are common in myelodysplastic syndromes," Nature Genetics, vol.
Several human populations have independently acquired mutations that allow them to use milk as a nutritious food source into adulthood.
The book itself (chapters 45 and 46) describes the probable ways in which acquired mutations can be atherogenic and can be a necessary causal co-actor in most cases of fatal ischemic heart disease.

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