Aconitum


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Related to Aconitum: Aconitum napellus

Aconitum

a genus of the Ranunculaceae family from northern temperate areas. Includes A. chasmanthum, A. columbianum, A. ferox, A. vaccarum, A. vulpari.

Aconitum napellus
one of the most poisonous of British plants. All parts of the plant contain aconitine, one of the plant's toxic alkaloids. The dried tuberous root was used pharmaceutically as a counterirritant and local anesthetic. The plant is not usually eaten and field poisoning with it is uncommon. Signs of poisoning include vomiting, colic, slow heart rate, paralysis, pupillary dilatation and death due to asphyxia. Called also monkshood, wolf's bane, aconite.
References in periodicals archive ?
We also used Aconitum 200C (I think I'm gonna die) and Rescue Remedy (five-flower Bach Remedy).
Some have simply fallen out of popularity in favour of different herbs based on greater physiological understanding, while others such as Ignatia, Gelsemium, Aconitum, Cactus and Sanguinaria are now used preferentially in homeopathic potencies, in some cases their use in material doses having been scheduled.
Spascupreel contains Colocynthis 4 x, Ammonium bromatum 4 x, Atropinum sulfuricum 6 x, Veratrum album 6 x, Magnesium phosphoricum 6 x, Gelsemium 5 x, Passiflora incarnata 1 x, Chamomilla 3 x, Cuprum sulfuricum 6x, and Aconitum 5x.
Raise You Five proved too strong for Aconitum in the novice handicap hurdle, the mare scoring in the colours of JP McManus.
These all make very good cut flowers but, beware; rather like a close relative, the monkshood, aconitum, the seeds are poisonous.
Although aconitum is deadly poisonous, I can't do without it for the intense blues it brings to the garden - aconitum carmichaelii flowers in the autumn.
When most other plants are fading, the tall spikes of Aconitum carmichaelii 'Arendsii' open up, giving height and colour to the garden.
Aconitum carmichaelii "Arendsii" WHEN most other plants are fading, the tall spikes of Aconitum carmichaelii Arendsii open up, giving height and colour to the garden.
It would certainly light up a yellow and blue border, and contrast wonderfully with inky-blue aconitum.
In addition, Radix Aconiti lateralis Preparata contains very small amounts of the aconitum alkaloids, such as aconitine, mesaconitine, and hypaconitine, which are highly toxic but can be hydrolyzed to the more active but less toxic alkaloids, including benzoylaconine, benzoylmesaconine, and benzoylhypaconine that have significant anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities (Suzuki et al.
Aconitum ferox, a very toxic species of the plant, grows around the Himalayas and N epal.