aconite

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Related to Aconitum: Aconitum napellus

aconite

 [ak´ah-nīt]
an extremely toxic substance from the dried root of Aconitum napellus (monkshood or wolfsbane), containing several closely related alkaloids, principally aconitine. It has variable effects on the heart leading to heart failure and it also affects the central nervous system; poisoning can be fatal, and with large doses death may be instantaneous. It was formerly used as an antipyretic and cardiac and respiratory depressant and topically as a counterirritant and local anesthetic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ac·o·nite

(ak'ō-nīt),
The dried root of Aconitum napellus (family Ranunculaceae), commonly known as monkshood or wolfsbane; a powerful and rapid-acting poison formerly used as an antipyretic, diuretic, diaphoretic, anodyne, cardiac and respiratory depressant, and externally as an analgesic.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

aconite

(ăk′ə-nīt′)
n.
1. Any of various usually poisonous perennial herbs of the genus Aconitum in the buttercup family, having tuberous roots, palmately lobed leaves, and blue, purple, or white flowers with a large hoodlike upper sepal.
2. The dried leaves and roots of some of these plants, which yield a poisonous alkaloid that was formerly used medicinally. In both senses also called monkshood, wolfsbane.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

aconite

Herbal medicine
An alkaloid derived from the plant by the same name, which formerly had currency as a medicinal herb; given aconite’s toxicity, it is no longer used in herbal medicine.

Toxicity
Abdominal pain, anxiety, blurred vision, bradycardia, burning sensation, cardiac arrhythmias, chest pain, diaphoresis, dyspnoea, impaired speech, muscular weakness, nausea, paresthesias, vertigo, vomiting, and possibly death due to respiratory failure or ventricular fibrillation.

Management
Gastric lavage, atropine, digitalis.
 
Homeopathy
A homeopathic remedy for treating swelling, fever, infections, restlessness, anxiety and panic attacks, and parasthesias; it has also been used for anginal pain, arrhythmias, arthritis, asthma, bronchitis, respiratory infections, laryngitis, sore throat, toothaches. In homeopathy, aconite’s concentration is extremely low, thus reducing its potential toxicity.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ac·o·nite

(ak'ŏ-nīt)
The dried root of Aconitum napellus (family Ranunculaceae), commonly known as wolfsbane; a powerful and rapid-acting poison formerly used as an antipyretic, diuretic, diaphoretic, anodyne, cardiac and respiratory depressant, and externally as an analgesic.
Synonym(s): fu tzu, monkshood.
[L. aconitum, fr. G. akoniton]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

aconite

A poisonous mixture of alkaloids derived from the roots of the plant Aconitum napellus . Also known as Wolf's bane, Monskhood and Friar's cowl. Aconite is no longer used in medicine.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The National Collections of Aconitum, seven species and 22 varieties, is held by Ms D.
Shenfu injection, which originated from Shenfu decoction, a well-known traditional Chinese medicine, is composed of red ginseng (Panax, family: Araliaceae) and aconite (Radix aconiti lateralis preparata, Aconitum carmichaelii Debx; family: Ranunculaceae).
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Ghatajabai Th Mes Ranunculaceae Aconitum violaceum Zahar Mora Cr Mes Jacq.
Aconite (Aconitum napellus or Monkshood) is the number one remedy to consider for those frozen by sheer panic and terror.
Other prickly candidates include creeping juniper, common holly, firethorn (pyracantha), juniper and purple berberis.terrors Aconitum - also known as 4Toxic monkshood or wolfsbane - is among the most toxic of plants, with ingestion of even a small amount causing stomach upsets.
answers WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN: Elton John; Aconitum spp; Mexico City; 1995 REMEMBER WHEN: 1972 IMPOSSIPUZZLES: 22 blue marbles, 8 red, 15 green WORDWISE: C WHO AM I: Andrew Strauss 10 QUESTIONS: 1.
Here are five of the most common toxic plants: | MONKSHOOD (Aconitum, right) OFTEN planted under trees or spring-flowering shrubs at the back of a border, bearing tall spikes of helmeted flowers in blues and purples in the summer, all parts of the plant are poisonous and a skin irritant, causing burning of the lips and mouth, intense vomiting, diarrhoea and spasms.
Phytotoxic and insecticidal activity of medicinal plants of Pakistan, Trichodesma indicum, Aconitum leaves and Sauroumatum guttatum.
Perennials with deep tap roots can't be divided so leave the likes of oriental poppies, lupins and eryngiums alone and some such as hellebores, dierama and aconitum prefer not to be disturbed at all.
In this study, researchers from the Universidade Federal do Para in Brazil add to work previously done in this area by using a homeopathic mixture referred to as Canova (homeopathically potentised Aconitum napellus, Arsenicum album, Bryonia alba, Lachesis muta, Thuja occidentalis) to determine its effect on the mitotic index of phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes.
Toxicological evaluation revealed that aconites from the Aconitum rootstocks were the only plausible casual factor for intoxication.