aconite

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Related to Aconites: Eranthis hyemalis, winter aconite

aconite

 [ak´ah-nīt]
an extremely toxic substance from the dried root of Aconitum napellus (monkshood or wolfsbane), containing several closely related alkaloids, principally aconitine. It has variable effects on the heart leading to heart failure and it also affects the central nervous system; poisoning can be fatal, and with large doses death may be instantaneous. It was formerly used as an antipyretic and cardiac and respiratory depressant and topically as a counterirritant and local anesthetic.

ac·o·nite

(ak'ō-nīt),
The dried root of Aconitum napellus (family Ranunculaceae), commonly known as monkshood or wolfsbane; a powerful and rapid-acting poison formerly used as an antipyretic, diuretic, diaphoretic, anodyne, cardiac and respiratory depressant, and externally as an analgesic.

aconite

(ăk′ə-nīt′)
n.
1. Any of various usually poisonous perennial herbs of the genus Aconitum in the buttercup family, having tuberous roots, palmately lobed leaves, and blue, purple, or white flowers with a large hoodlike upper sepal.
2. The dried leaves and roots of some of these plants, which yield a poisonous alkaloid that was formerly used medicinally. In both senses also called monkshood, wolfsbane.

aconite

Herbal medicine
An alkaloid derived from the plant by the same name, which formerly had currency as a medicinal herb; given aconite’s toxicity, it is no longer used in herbal medicine.

Toxicity
Abdominal pain, anxiety, blurred vision, bradycardia, burning sensation, cardiac arrhythmias, chest pain, diaphoresis, dyspnoea, impaired speech, muscular weakness, nausea, paresthesias, vertigo, vomiting, and possibly death due to respiratory failure or ventricular fibrillation.

Management
Gastric lavage, atropine, digitalis.
 
Homeopathy
A homeopathic remedy for treating swelling, fever, infections, restlessness, anxiety and panic attacks, and parasthesias; it has also been used for anginal pain, arrhythmias, arthritis, asthma, bronchitis, respiratory infections, laryngitis, sore throat, toothaches. In homeopathy, aconite’s concentration is extremely low, thus reducing its potential toxicity.

ac·o·nite

(ak'ŏ-nīt)
The dried root of Aconitum napellus (family Ranunculaceae), commonly known as wolfsbane; a powerful and rapid-acting poison formerly used as an antipyretic, diuretic, diaphoretic, anodyne, cardiac and respiratory depressant, and externally as an analgesic.
Synonym(s): fu tzu, monkshood.
[L. aconitum, fr. G. akoniton]

aconite

A poisonous mixture of alkaloids derived from the roots of the plant Aconitum napellus . Also known as Wolf's bane, Monskhood and Friar's cowl. Aconite is no longer used in medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aconite, used in Chinese herbal recipes, requires proper processing before being deemed safe for human consumption.
Once you have an established drift of winter aconites, a number of the bulbs should be dug up and replanted immediately after they have flowered and with a bit of green leaf attached.
Rake the lawn to remove old thatch and lift and transplant snowdrops and aconites ?
Given these conditions, our native wild Primrose will associate itself with many other woodland favourites, including Snowdrops (Galanthus nivalis), Winter Aconites (Eranthus hyemalis), Periwinkle (Vinca minor), Cyclamen hederifolium, Narcissi and Violas.
Yesterday it reported snowdrops are out and winter aconites are under the magnolia.
WITH buttercup-like flowers on glossy green foliage from January to March, winter aconites, or Eranthis hyemalis, can really cheer up a garden.
EASY Clear leaves and debris from borders underplanted with snowdrops and winter aconites so flowers show.
Further south, Wiltshire Heale Gardens is also known for its annual drifts of snowdrops and aconites.
Thin out winter aconites while the plants are in active growth, digging up small clumps with roots and moving to a new site.
* SUNNY SIDE: Make gardening fun * WINTER WONDER: Winter aconites a relative of the buttercup and give gardens a real lift at this time of year
As well as the thousands of snowdrops in Monk's Walk, winter aconites and other spring flowers could be seen.
WINTER aconites (Eranthis hyemalis), with its starry golden flowers, will brighten up your garden on even the dullest winter's day.