Acinetobacter

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Related to Acinetobacter lwoffii: Acinetobacter baumannii

Acinetobacter

(as-i-ne'tō-bak'ter),
A genus of nonmotile, aerobic bacteria (family Moraxellaceae) containing gram-negative or -variable coccoid or short rods, or cocci, often occurring in pairs. Spores are not produced. These bacteria grow on ordinary media without the addition of serum. They are oxidase negative and catalase positive; carbohydrates are oxidized or not attacked at all, and arginine dihydrolase is not produced. They are a frequent cause of nosocomial infections; often resistant to many antibiotics, they can also cause severe primary infections in immunocompromised people. The type species is Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.
Synonym(s): Lingelsheimia

Acinetobacter

(ă′sə-nē′tō-băk′tər, -nĕt′ō-, -nē′tō-băk′-, nĕt′ō-)
n.
A genus of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria occurring primarily in soil and water, including many pathogenic species.

Acinetobacter

A widely distributed genus of bacteria found in moist hospital environments, which may establish itself in the respiratory flora and on the skin of patients after prolonged hospitalisation, often via contaminated medical instruments—e.g., catheters and IV lines, which introduce Acinetobacter to normally sterile sites. Infections are generally nosocomial, occur in warmer seasons and involve the genitourinary and respiratory tracts, wounds, and soft tissues.

Ac·i·ne·to·bac·ter

(as-i-nē'tō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of nonmotile, aerobic bacteria (family Moraxellaceae), frequently a cause of nosocomial infections; often resistant to antibiotics, can also cause severe primary infections in immunocompromised patients.
Synonym(s): Lingelsheimia.

Ac·i·ne·to·bac·ter

(as-i-nē'tō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of nonmotile, non-spore-forming aerobic bacteria containing gram-negative or -variable coccoid or short rods, or cocci, often occurring in pairs; a frequent cause of nosocomial infections; often resistant to many antibiotics, can also cause severe primary infections in immunocompromised people.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pseudomonas aeruginosa 77.78% was predominantly produces MBL, followed by Klebsiella pneumonia 66.67%, Acinetobacter baumannii 62.5% and Acinetobacter lwoffii 50%.
Rajender Kaur, "Pyogenic liver abscess caused by acinetobacter Lwoffii: A case report," Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, vol.
Antony, "Acinetobacter lwoffii: Bacteremia associated with acute gastroenteritis," Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, vol.
Community-acquired pneumonia due to Acinetobacter lwoffii in a patient infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.
coli) was 1,204 (40%), Klebsiella pneumoniae 802 (27%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa 406 (13.4%), Proteus mirabilis 66 (2%), Acinetobacter baumannii 56 (2%), Salmonella typhi 34 (1.4%), Citrobacter freundii 33 (1%), Enterobacter cloacae 33 (1%) followed by others like Acinetobacter lwoffii, Salmonella paratyphi A, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella oxytoca, Serratia marcescens, Proteus vulgaris, Providencia species and Morganella morganii.
nov and emended description of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Acinetobacter lwoffii. Int.
Setting of acquisition Microorganism Community- Nosocomial acquired N (%) N (%) Gram-positive Abiotrophia species 1 (100) 0 Enterococcus faecalis 5 (71.4) 2 (28.6) Enterococcus gallinarum 1 (100) 0 Gemella haemolysans 1 (100) 0 Leuconostoc species 1 (100) 0 Listeria monocytogenes 0 3 (100) Staphylococcus aureus 0 1 (100) Staphylococcus capitis 2 (100) 0 Staphylococcus epidermidis 14 (87.5) 2 (12.5) Staphylococcus haemolyticus 2 (100) 0 Streptococcus agalactiae 0 3 (100) Streptococcus bovis II 0 1 (100) Streptococcus intermedius 0 1 (100) Streptococcus milleri 0 1 (100) Streptococcus mitis 0 1 (100) Streptococcus pneumoniae 0 19 (100) Streptococcus salivarius 0 1 (100) Gram-negative Acinetobacter baumannii 8 (100) 0 Acinetobacter lwoffii 2 (66.7) 1 (33,3) Brucella spp.
(33.) Rathinavelu S, Zavros Y, Merchant JL, Acinetobacter lwoffii infection and gastritis.
(46.) Zavros Y, Rieder G, Ferguson A, Merchant JL, Gastritis and hypergastrinemia due to Acinetobacter lwoffii in mice.
Most common Acinetobacter species isolated was Acinetobacter baumannii (74.50%), followed by Acinetobacter lwoffii (24.50%) and Acinetobacter haemolyticus (0.98%) [Table 2]