Acinetobacter

(redirected from Acinetobacter infections)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to Acinetobacter infections: Acinetobacter baumannii

Acinetobacter

(as-i-ne'tō-bak'ter),
A genus of nonmotile, aerobic bacteria (family Moraxellaceae) containing gram-negative or -variable coccoid or short rods, or cocci, often occurring in pairs. Spores are not produced. These bacteria grow on ordinary media without the addition of serum. They are oxidase negative and catalase positive; carbohydrates are oxidized or not attacked at all, and arginine dihydrolase is not produced. They are a frequent cause of nosocomial infections; often resistant to many antibiotics, they can also cause severe primary infections in immunocompromised people. The type species is Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.
Synonym(s): Lingelsheimia
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Acinetobacter

(ă′sə-nē′tō-băk′tər, -nĕt′ō-, -nē′tō-băk′-, nĕt′ō-)
n.
A genus of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria occurring primarily in soil and water, including many pathogenic species.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Acinetobacter

A widely distributed genus of bacteria found in moist hospital environments, which may establish itself in the respiratory flora and on the skin of patients after prolonged hospitalisation, often via contaminated medical instruments—e.g., catheters and IV lines, which introduce Acinetobacter to normally sterile sites. Infections are generally nosocomial, occur in warmer seasons and involve the genitourinary and respiratory tracts, wounds, and soft tissues.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Ac·i·ne·to·bac·ter

(as-i-nē'tō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of nonmotile, aerobic bacteria (family Moraxellaceae), frequently a cause of nosocomial infections; often resistant to antibiotics, can also cause severe primary infections in immunocompromised patients.
Synonym(s): Lingelsheimia.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Ac·i·ne·to·bac·ter

(as-i-nē'tō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of nonmotile, non-spore-forming aerobic bacteria containing gram-negative or -variable coccoid or short rods, or cocci, often occurring in pairs; a frequent cause of nosocomial infections; often resistant to many antibiotics, can also cause severe primary infections in immunocompromised people.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
An update on the arsenal for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter infections: polymyxin antibiotics.
This report provides comprehensive information on the therapeutic development for Acinetobacter Infections, complete with comparative analysis at various stages, therapeutics assessment by drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type, along with latest updates, and featured news and press releases.
According to studies, acinetobacter infections are not uncommon in preterm ICUs and there are reports of infant deaths in other countries.
difficile) infection, an oral treatment to reduce the impact of methane producing organisms on constipation- predominant irritable bowel syndrome (C-IBS), a series of monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of Pertussis and Acinetobacter infections, and a biologic targeted at the prevention and treatment of a root cause of a subset of IBS.
Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter infections in critically injured Canadian forces soldiers.
Since drug resistance pattern of A.baumannii keeps on changing, local surveillance studies conducted at regular intervals will help in deciding the most adequate therapy for Acinetobacter infections. Furthermore prudent use of antibiotics either empirically or therapeutic for the treatment of A.baumannii infections should be included in the antibiotic policy of the hospital so that multi -drug resistant Acinetobacter strains may not develop in the near future.
Worldwide, treatment of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter infections poses a great therapeutic challenge to clinicians.
* Until further data become available, no firm recommendations can be made with regard to the testing or clinical utility of tigecycline, either alone or in combination with polymyxin, the carbapenems (regardless of the mode of delivery), rifampicin (or possibly fosfomycin) for life-threatening MDR Acinetobacter infections. It would, however, seem prudent to use tigecycline at higher doses and in combination with other agents in such infections.
The major challenge in treating Acinetobacter infections is that most strains are MDR.
With the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) or pandrug-resistant (PDR) isolates, few drugs are now available to treat MDR or PDR Acinetobacter infections; polymyxins are the only therapeutic option in many cases (2).
Coverage includes avian influenza, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), changing patterns of respiratory viral infections in transplant recipients, West Nile virus, emergence of novel retroviruses, community- associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, the emerging role of Klebsiella in liver abscess, zygomycosis, emerging food- and waterborne protozoan diseases, multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter infections in US military personnel, and adverse events in smallpox vaccination.