Achilles tendon

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Related to Achilles tendons: Achilles tendinitis

Achilles tendon

 [ah-kil´ēz]
the strong tendon at the back of the heel that connects the calf muscles (triceps surae muscle) to the heel bone. The name is derived from the legend of the Greek hero Achilles, who was vulnerable only in one heel. Tapping this tendon normally produces the reflex called the Achilles or ankle jerk. Failure or exaggeration of this reflex indicates disease or injury to the nerves of the leg muscles or of a part of the spinal cord.

cal·ca·ne·al ten·don

[TA]
the thick tendon of insertion of the triceps surae (gastrocnemius and soleus) into the tuberosity of the calcaneus.

Achilles tendon

n.
The large tendon connecting the heel bone to the calf muscles of the leg.

Achilles tendon

The long common tendon of both venters of the calf muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus), which attaches them to the calcaneus bone; it is the strongest tendon in the body. The AT begins below the posterior calf and is attached distally at the midline at the posterior aspect of the calcaneus.
 
Conditions affecting Achilles tendon
Insertional tendinitis, rupture.

Achilles tendon

tendo calcaneo Anatomy The tendon that attaches the calf muscles to the calcaneous bone; the long common tendon of both venters–bellies of the calf muscles—gastrocnemius and soleus, which is the strongest tendon in the body; the AT begins below the posterior calf and is attached distally at the midline at the posterior aspect of the calcaneus Conditions affecting Insertional tendinitis, rupture

ten·do cal·ca·ne·us

(ten'dō kal-kā'nē-ŭs) [TA]
The tendon of insertion of the triceps surae (gastrocnemius and soleus) into the tuberosity of the calcaneus.
Synonym(s): Achilles tendon, heel tendon.

Achilles tendon

The prominent tendon just above the heel by means of which the powerful muscles of the calf are attached to the large heel bone. Contraction of the prominent calf muscles pulls the Achilles tendon upwards so that the ankle is straightened and the heel leaves the ground. The Achilles tendon is essential in walking and running and is easily strained or torn. (Named after Achilles, son of Peleus and Thetis, who, as a baby, was said to have been held by his heel and dipped in the river Styx by his mother to make him invulnerable. He died from a heel wound).

Achilles,

mythical Greek warrior who was vulnerable only in the heel.
Achilles bursa - bursa between the tendo calcaneus and the upper part of the posterior surface of the calcaneum. Synonym(s): bursa of tendo calcaneus
Achilles reflex - a contraction of the calf muscles when the tendo calcaneus is sharply struck. Synonym(s): ankle jerk; ankle reflex; tendo Achillis reflex; triceps surae reflex
Achilles tendon - the tendon of insertion of the triceps surae (gastrocnemius and soleus) into the tuberosity of the calcaneus. Synonym(s): tendo calcaneus
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, in this study, we investigated the relationship between Achilles tendon stiffness (ATS) and GCT.
Dancers were found to have shorter Achilles tendons when compared to non-dancers.
Achilles tendon structure improves on UTC imaging over a 5-month pre-season in elite Australian football players.
It must be noted that some beak fractures can receive fibers from the Achilles tendon [10,11].
A portable ultrasound unit (Esaote MyLab 25) was used to obtain ultrasound images of the Achilles tendon of the left leg.
The Achilles tendon gets its blood supply mainly from posterior tibial artery through its anterior mesotenon.
Research results now surprisingly show that the Achilles tendon remains the same throughout adult life.
Achilles tendon rupture is usually associated with an acute traumatic episode (Piermatte et al., 2006 and King and Jerram, 2003) and rarely injuries are degenerative in nature (Piermatte et al., 2006).
When Sabrina measured his Achilles tendon excursion, however, she got a surprise: the ultrasound scans showed that his Achilles tendon excursion was only about half of what she had seen in similar measurements made in relatively nonathletic graduate student volunteers for the same joint rotation.
Even the plastic surgeons there admit sharks fin and cow's Achilles tendon is a strange combination, but the fact remains that together they trick the body into creating new skin cells which grow over burns ( a process more effective than grafting and with more realistic-looking final results.