acetyl-CoA

(redirected from Acetyl-coenzyme A)
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a·ce·tyl-CoA

(a-sĕ'til),
Condensation product of coenzyme A and acetic acid, symbolized as CoAS~COCH3 or as AcCoa; an intermediate in the transfer of two-carbon fragments, notably in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and in fatty acid synthesis.

acetyl-CoA

(ə-sēt′l-kō′ā′, ăs′ĭ-tl-)

Acetyl-CoA

A coenzyme derivative in the metabolism of glucose and fatty acids that contributes substrates to the Krebs cycle. Acetyl CoA provides the acetyl for multiple biochemical reactions and plays a key role in intermediary metabolism—synthesis, catabolism, or use of nutrients for energy production and growth.

acetyl-CoA

Acetylcoenzyme A Metabolism A coenzyme derivative in the metabolism of glucose and fatty acids that contributes substrates to the Krebs cycle; acetyl CoA provides the acetyl unit for multiple biochemical reactions and plays a central role in intermediary metabolism–synthesis, catabolism, or use of nutrients for energy production and growth. See Citric acid cycle.

a·ce·tyl-CoA

(as'ĕ-til)
Condensation product of coenzyme A and acetic acid, symbolized as CoAS∼COCH3; intermediate in transfer of two-carbon fragment, notably in its entrance into the tricarboxylic acid cycle and in fatty acid synthesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acetyl-coenzyme A was used as a control for the substrate specificity The amounts of added substrate (calf thymus histone proteins) in each reaction were visualized by Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB).
Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase Messenger Ribonucleic Acid Metabolism in Liver, Adipose Tissues, and Mammary Glands During Pregnancy and Lactation.
[3] Human genes: SCD, stearoyl-CoA desaturase (delta-9-desaturase); ACACA, acetyl-Coenzyme A carboxylase alpha; FASN, fatty acid synthase; SREBF1, sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1.
Abbreviations: ACCase, acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase; Acc1 and Acc2, locus designations for acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase genes 1 and 2, respectively; cM, centimorgan; RFLP, restriction fragment length polymorphism; S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, and S6, genetic lines carrying allele for tolerance to sethoxydim; H1 and H2, genetic lines carrying allele for tolerance to haloxyfop.
Characterization of maize acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase.
Isoforms of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase in Lolium multiflorum.
A diclofopmethyl-resistant Avena sterilis biotype with a herbicide-resistant acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase and enhanced metabolism of diclofop-methyl.
Dominant mutations causing alterations in acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase confer tolerance to cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides in maize.
Acetyl-Coenzyme A acetyltransferase 2 (ACAT) transforms acetyl-CoA into acetoacetyl-CoA and can increases the rate of ketogenesis.
Coverage includes the biogeochemistry of nickel and its release into the environment; the impact of nickel on the metabolism of cyanobacteria and eukaryotic plants; the complex formation of nickel with amino acids and peptides, and with sugar residues, nucleobases, phosphates, ucleosides, and nucleic acids; synthetic models for the active sites of nickel- containing enzymes; the role of nickel in enzymes such as ureases, hydrogenases, superoxide dismutases, acireductone dioxygenases, acetyl-coenzyme A synthases, carbon monoxide dehydrogenases, and methyl-coenzyme M reductases; chaperones of nickel metabolism; the role of nickel in environmental adaptation of the gastric pathogen Helicobacer pylori; nickel-dependent gene expression; and nickel toxicity and carcinogenesis.
The role of adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase in metabolism of acetyl-coenzyme A and function of blood platelets in diabetes mellitus.
Platelet function and acetyl-coenzyme A metabolism in type 1 diabetes mellitus.