nucleus accumbens

(redirected from Accumbens)

nu·cle·us ac·cum·'bens

[TA]
the region of fusion between the head of the caudate nucleus and the putamen, covered on its inferior aspect by the olfactory tubercle. Its former name nucleus accumbens septi ("a nucleus leaning against the septum") refers to a medial, hook-shaped expansion of this anteroventral region of the striatum, which curves under the floor of the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle and ascends for some distance into the ventral half of the septal region. Composed of a pars lateralis [TA] (lateral part [TA] or core region [TAalt]) and a pars medialis [TA] (medial part [TA] or shell region [TAalt]).

nucleus accumbens

A limbic nucleus that sits at the ventral head of the striatum, contiguous with the caudate and putamen and adjacent to the olfactory tubercle. The nucleus accumbens is part of the ventral striatum nuclei. Synapses in the nucleus accumbens use dopamine as their neurotransmitter. Increasing the activity of these synapses (i.e., increasing the level of dopamine in the nucleus) leads to a rewarding or pleasurable sensation. This is thought to partly explain the addictive effect of those drugs, such as cocaine and amphetamine, that increase the level of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens.
See also: nucleus
References in periodicals archive ?
The high-glycemic meal produced an initial surge in blood sugar levels followed four hours later by a crashing decrease in blood glucose, excessive hunger, and intense activation of the brain's nucleus accumbens, a brain region involved with addictive behaviors.
This decrease in blood glucose was associated with excessive hunger and intense activation of the nucleus accumbens, a critical brain region involved in addictive behaviors.''
Moreover, some properties of opioids, including hyperlocomotion and reward, are at least partly mediated through dopamine receptors [11], and morphine is reported to increase the metabolism of dopamine in the septum and nucleus accumbens [12].
Scientists found that strengthening signaling along a neural pathway that runs through the nucleus accumbens -- a region of the brain involved in motivation, pleasure, and addiction -- can reduce cocaine-seeking behavior in mice.
In those studies, however, the physicians had not implanted the electrodes into the medial fore-brain bundle but instead into the nucleus accumbens, another part of the brain's reward system.
Mesolimbic dopamine system: System of interconnected brain regions consisting of the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, and components of the limbic system, such as the amygdala; is considered the brain's reward pathway that mediates the rewarding effects associated with alcohol and other drug use as well as other experiences.
The main areas are the ventral tegmental area (VTA) located in the mid-brain just above the hippocampus and in front of the substantia nigra; the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the striatum just below the front end of the corpus callosum; and the prefrontal cortex, located just behind the forehead and just in front of the motor areas of the cortex.
Asi mismo, se ha encontrado atrofia regional del caudado y del hipocampo, adelgazamiento cortical selectivo en las areas sensoriomotora, premotora y visual; patrones de atrofia unicos en el paciente con VIH que permiten diferenciar el sindrome demencial, como el crecimiento ventricular, atrofias del caudado, del putamen y del nucleo accumbens (6).
This study, which is published in the journal NeuroImage, adds to mounting evidence that overeating and increased weight are linked, in part, to a region of the brain associated with motivation and reward, called the nucleus accumbens. Responses in this region have been shown to predict weight gain in healthy weight and obese individuals, but only now have academics discovered that this is independent of conscious feelings of hunger.
Long-term effects of nucleus accumbens deep brain stimulation in treatment-resistant depression: evidence for sustained efficacy [published online aheadof print April 4, 2012].
En un trabajo publicado en la revista Science Translational Medicine, investigadores de la Clinica Ernest Gallo y de la UCSF informaron que el receptor [mu] (Mu) liberador de endorfinas (opioides producidos por el organismo) es estimulado por el consumo de alcohol, y que esas endorfinas se acumulan en el nucleo accumbens y la corteza orbitofrontal del cerebro, la cuales estan relacionadas con el centro del placer y la sensacion de bienestar y satisfaccion, es decir "de sentirse bien".