acedia

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a·ce·di·a

(ă-sē'dē-ă),
Obsolete term for a mental syndrome, the chief features of which are listlessness, carelessness, apathy, and melancholia.

acedia

A nebulous and obsolete term for a state of melancholy, apathy and disinterest in the environment. The modern equivalents would be the blues, abulia.

acedia

(ă-sē′dē-ă) [L. fr. Gr. akēdeia, heedlessness]
Mental state of indifference, insensibility; lack of energy or emotion; apathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Accidie will be felt only in communities that for some reason value tedious activity that must be dutifully and enthusiastically performed.
A grasp of accidie may be required if one is to have access to a particular painting of a religious hermit such as St Jerome.
Case histories of accidie or sentimentality will disclose factors that shape them.
Bunting thought the Medusa did little more than underscore the accidie. Within the larger narrative of the Inferno, cantos 7 through 9 record a second major crisis in Dante's journey, a moment when he fears he will not be able to go on.
The complex history of acedia - a variant of accidie - is well documented in Reinhard Kuhn's brilliant book, The Demon of Noontide, where Kuhn traces at great length the evolution of the word from the fourth century, when it first became "the recognized designation for a condition of the soul characterized by torpor, dryness, and indifference culminating in a disgust concerning anything to do with the spiritual" (Kuhn 40).
Accidie may be Theo's word for his condition; the reader is likely to think of it in terms of a family pathology--the incapacity for love running as a kind of refrain through Theo's autobiography.
Shrewd historian of ideas Aldous Huxley, cited in Lowry's "Those Coal to Newcastle Blues" (Lowry 1992, 44), makes precisely that point in his 1923 essay "Accidie." Proceeding with due circumspection, Huxley retraces to the onset of "romanticism" the "triumph of the daemon meridianus," "the progress" of a medieval "deadly sin" to the status of "a literary virtue, a spiritual mode," "an essentially lyrical emotion fruitful in the inspiration of much of the most characteristic modern literature" (1971, 21, 22).
In Consul Geoffrey Firmin, according to Burgess, Lowry creates "a giant character whose sloth or accidie ...
Nevertheless, it is art and not science or any other pragmatically rationalized form that (according to Read) `gives a meaning to life', not merely in the sense of overcoming alienation but in the sense of `reconciling man to his destiny, which is death', not in the physical sense, but `that form of death which is indifference, spiritual accidie'.
precisely captures the state of acedia or dejection of spirit (accidie)