accident-proneness

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accident-proneness

The state of being accident-prone.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a relatively small proportion of individuals appeared to be responsible for a relatively large proportion of accidents, the notion of accident proneness gained a life of its own, particularly as it appeared to excuse factory managers from the responsibility for removing or controlling hazards in the workplace.
In the same vein, Porter (1988) suggested that accident proneness is not an enduring trait that attaches itself to the individual but, rather, is more likely to arise from a combination of predispositions and circumstances (e.g., an anxious individual who is overworked and is operating a new machine for the first time).
attributing multiple accidents to accident proneness is like saying that a sore throat is due to chronic pharyngitis" (p.
Public health authorities played an increasing role in redefining the home accident field, moving from theories of "accident proneness" in the 1940s and 50s to concepts of "injury control" in the 1960s.
Most studies have attempted to explain this phenomenon by appealing to the notion of differences in "accident proneness" of the individuals in the particular group under analysis.
[9] Venezian, Emilio C., 1980, Good Drivers and Bad Drivers -- A Markov Model of accident Proneness, Proceedings of the Casualty Actuarial Society 68:65-85.
The term "accident proneness" was coined in 1926 by researchers who believed personality traits caused some people to have more accidents than others.
The benefit-to-risk evaluation of prescribing a benzodiazepine with an antidepressant ought to include consideration of potential dependence, accident proneness, teratogenicity, and difficulty in tapering off the benzodiazepine.
Studies of accident proneness have attracted a significant amount of controversy.
The positive effect of NA on injuries is consistent with the literature on accident proneness. Several researchers have previously identified the role of neuroticism (negative affectivity) in predicting accidents (Hansen, 1989; Shaw & Sichel, 1971; Sutherland & Cooper, 1991).
Accident statistics and the concept of accident proneness. Biometrics, 7, 340-342.
See, for example, Ruth Morris Bakwin and Harry Bakwin, "Accident Proneness," Journal of Pediatrics 32 (1948): 749-752, and "Deaths in Children Due to Accident," ibid., p.
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