accessory spleen

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spleen

 [splēn]
a large glandlike but ductless organ in the upper part of the abdominal cavity on the left side, lateral to the cardiac end of the stomach. Called also lien. adj., adj splen´ic. It is the largest collection of reticuloendothelial cells in the body and is composed of spongelike tissue of two types: red pulp, which is the dark reddish brown substance filling the interspaces of the sinuses of the spleen, and white pulp, which consists of sheaths of lymphatic tissue surrounding the arteries of the spleen. It is enclosed in a dense capsule. In a normal adult the spleen is about 12.5 cm long and weighs about 140 to 210 g. After gastric digestion and in the presence of disease the spleen enlarges.



During fetal life the spleen and liver produce erythrocytes, but after birth that function is taken over by the bone marrow. However, if there is bone marrow failure, the spleen may again produce erythrocytes. In the normal adult the spleen is a reservoir for blood, and contains a high concentration of erythrocytes. In times of exertion, emotional stress, pregnancy, severe bleeding, carbon monoxide poisoning, or other occasions when the oxygen content of the blood must be increased, the spleen contracts rhythmically to release its store of erythrocytes into the bloodstream.

The spleen also acts to help keep the blood free of unwanted substances, including wastes and infecting organisms. The blood is delivered to it by the splenic artery, and passes through smaller branch arteries into a network of channels lined with leukocytes known as phagocytes (see reticuloendothelial system). These clear the blood of old erythrocytes, damaged cells, parasites, and other toxic or foreign substances. Hemoglobin from the removed red cells is temporarily stored.
accessory spleen a small mass of tissue elsewhere in the body, histologically and functionally identical with that composing the normal spleen.

ac·ces·so·ry spleen

[TA]
one of the small globular masses of splenic tissue occasionally found in the region of the spleen, in one of the peritoneal folds or elsewhere.

accessory spleen

Etymology: L, accessus, extra; Gk, splen
small nodules of splenic tissue that may occur in the gastrosplenic ligament, greater omentum, or other visceral sites.

accessory spleen

splen accessorius Any of a number of small aggregates or masses of encapsulated splenic tissue located adjacent to the spleen or along the gastrosplenic ligament. See Spleen.

ac·ces·so·ry spleen

(ak-ses'ŏr-ē splēn) [TA]
One of the small globular masses of splenic tissue occasionally found in the region of the spleen, in one of the peritoneal folds, or elsewhere.
Synonym(s): lien accessorius.

spleen

a large lymphoid organ usually situated in the cranial part of the abdominal cavity on the left of the stomach. The spleen contains the largest collection of reticuloendothelial cells in the body. In ruminants the spleen is located on the left lateral wall of the reticulum and under the last two ribs on the left side. Called also lien.

accessory spleen
a small mass of tissue, histologically and functionally identical with that composing the normal spleen but found elsewhere in the body.
slaughter spleen
see slaughter spleen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Splenules, or accessory spleens, are congenital foci of normal splenic tissue that are separate from the main body of the spleen.
Evolution of the CT imaging findings of accessory spleen infarction.
Accessory spleens result from the failure in the fifth week of foetal life of groups of mesodermal cells in the dorsal mesogastrum [1].
Triple-phase CT is usually performed to differentiate pancreatic lesions, and the attenuation of accessory spleens in the pancreas is usually identical to that of the spleen in all three phases.
3) Most accessory spleens (80%) are located at the splenic hilum, while fewer than 20% are in the pancreatic tail.
Accessory spleens in or at the tail of the pancreas: a survey of 2,700 additional necropsies.
The purpose of this study was to establish the range of splenic length and to determine the prevalence of accessory spleens in a population of healthy Turkish men.
Ectopic splenic tissue can be found in the body as two distinct forms: accessory spleens and splenosis.
I'm not a surgeon, but [I know that] there are some people who do have accessory spleens, and it is conceivable that you might have to take out a second spleen," he said.
Present in approximately 10% of the population, accessory spleens arise from the fusion failure of the splenic anlage and reside in close proximity to the splenocolic and gastrosplenic ligaments.
Accessory spleens should be removed because they may be a source of disease recurrence.
Two accessory spleens found at the time of exploration were removed as well.